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Supplier Stories for the Week of May 5

Here’s what was new in the world of medical device suppliers during the week of May 5

  • Medical device manufacturer Cirtronics will host the panel discussion, "Case Studies in Transition to Manufacturing," on Thursday, May 16, 3:00-4:00 pm during the upcoming BIOMEDevice Boston conference. During the discussion medtech experts will share their perspectives on taking medical device designs to full-scale production and provide examples for product design engineers, manufacturing engineers, and engineering team leaders. 

    “The group of experts will share their experiences of transitioning their medical devices from design to manufacturing. Panel members will focus on optimizing cost and quality in ways that align with the unique needs of each product," explained panel moderator Andy McMillan, who serves chair of Cirtronics’ Board of Advisors.

    McMillan will be joined by panelists Doug Vincent, president & CEO, VentriFlo; Daemeon Pratt, NPI engineering manager, Nordson Medical; and Corey Libby, vice president, research & development, Interscope Inc.  After the initial discussion,  the speakers will participate in a Q&A conversation with the audience.

    Cirtronics’s Transition to Manufacturing (T2M) services include optimizing part sourcing, traceability, test development and verification, pilot production, and manufacturing readiness strategy. These services are tailored to each of Cirtronics’ customer’s needs as they transition products from design to manufacturing, the company reported.

    Visit Cirtronics at Booth #749 to meet with Cirtronics’s T2M experts.

    [Image courtesy of CIRTRONICS]

    Editor's Note: If you have news you’d like to submit for potential inclusion in future weekly roundups, please send a press release and any related images to [email protected] with the subject line “Supplier Stories.”

  • Tekni-Plex business units Dunn Industries and Natvar will showcase acetal mandrel technology and custom tubing, respectively, at Booth #460 at BIOMEDevice Boston, May 15-16, Boston Convention & Exhibition Center.

    Dunn’s Catheter Cores can be used to retain critical lumen tolerances during manufacturing (extrusion, braiding, coiling and jacketing) of minimally invasive catheter shafts. Low-friction material properties and ultra-smooth surfaces allow these mandrels to be easily removed after catheter shaft assembly, the company reported in a news release. They are available in precise diameters from 0.020 to 0.250 in. with tolerances as low as +/- 0.0005 in. Dunn also manufactures custom medical tubing for diagnostic and interventional devices from a wide range of thermoplastics such as polyether block amides (PEBAs), thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs), thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), polyamides, polyolefins, and more. 

    Natvar’s new single-lumen silicone tubing capabilities include inside diameters from 0.2-25 mm (0.0079-0.984 in.), wall thicknesses ranging from 0.10-3.0 mm (0.0039-0.118 inches), and tolerances as low as +/- 0.03 mm (0.001 in.). This newly expanded range of Natvar silicone tubing is intended to better serve a range of medical pump applications, including peristaltic and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps, the company reported.

    [Image courtesy of TEKNI-PLEX]

    Editor's Note: If you have news you’d like to submit for potential inclusion in future weekly roundups, please send a press release and any related images to [email protected] with the subject line “Supplier Stories.”

  • The Bosch Packaging Technology company Moeller & Devicon has developed a range of assembly machinery for producing auto-injectors or insulin pens. The machines feature a compact design, a clear overview of all stations, and good accessibility, allowing manufacturers to change batches quickly, without loss of time for cleaning, according to Michael Andersen, sales director at Moeller & Devicon.

    The pen assembly machines from Moeller & Devicon are designed for standard four-piece disposable pens consisting of a pen cap, a cartridge holder, the cartridge itself, and a dosing mechanism. The machines for auto-injectors can be used to assemble either all single components – upper part, lower part, the syringe and the tool to hold the syringe – or a combination of pre-assembled and single components, Andersen explained. A scalable level of automation allows users to adapt the assembly equipment to different requirements and processes. For instance, when it comes to first clinical trials, small manual workstations are an ideal solution. Once the trials have been realized successfully and a switch to commercial production is needed, semi-automated or fully-automated assembly machines can be used. Thanks to the scalable approach, process validation of the equipment can be transferred from one machine to another.

    The modular design of the machine platforms makes it possible to adapt and retrofit them easily for future projects, Andersen reported. For example, integrating robots for specific process steps can be accomplished with only minor adaptations. In line with Bosch’s pharmaceutical line competence, the assembly machines can be complemented by equipment for container handling, filling and closing, inspection, labeling, and end-of-line packaging.

    Moeller & Devicon can collaborate with pharmaceutical companies and pen manufacturers at an early stage to define all necessary parameters of the final product and the matching assembly equipment, it was reported. Such collaboration facilitates development of machine designs that meet exact requirements.

    [Image courtesy of MOELLER & DEVICON, A BOSCH PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY COMPANY]

    Editor's Note: If you have news you’d like to submit for potential inclusion in future weekly roundups, please send a press release and any related images to [email protected] with the subject line “Supplier Stories.”

  • OKAY Industries Inc., a contract manufacturer that engineers components and subassemblies for original equipment manufacturers in the medical device and industrial markets, has promoted Steven Kmiec to director of manufacturing. Kmiec will oversee the daily manufacturing operations at OKAY Industries’s domestic facilities in New Britain and Berlin, CT, and will also support production activities for the company’s Costa Rica facility.

    “We could not be more thrilled for Steve to support us in this capacity,” said Jason Howey, president of OKAY Industries, in a news statement. “Since joining our team, Steve has demonstrated his expert knowledge every day. He addresses challenges with innovation, insight and efficiency, and consistently displays his ability to lead by example. His hands-on approach, passion and drive has earned him respect as both a leader and a team player.”

    Kmiec has more than 30 years of experience in product application and development engineering in a range of industries including medical, aerospace, automotive, defense, and consumer goods. He is a skilled operations and engineering manager as well as an experienced teambuilder, who is well-versed in computer-aided design (CAD), SolidWorks, CNC programming, lean operations, value stream mapping, and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), the company reported. He most recently served as a senior manufacturing engineer with OKAY Industries.

    [Image courtesy of OKAY INDUSTRIES]

    Editor's Note: If you have news you’d like to submit for potential inclusion in future weekly roundups, please send a press release and any related images to [email protected] with the subject line “Supplier Stories.”

  • Applied Motion Products offers compact step motors in NEMA sizes 8, 11, and 14 for applications with limited space including medical devices, 3D printers, analytical and medical instruments, textile equipment, laboratory automation equipment, surveillance equipment, camera controls, pumps, consumer electronics, packaging equipment, CNC machines, robotics, and more.

    These hybrid-type small motors offer the highest torque density in their frame size, the company reported in a news release. Available in both single and double-shaft versions, the lightweight and low-cost motors with a 1.8 step angle offer high torque up to 22 oz-in. To meet customers requirements for specific connectors and couplings, the company can provide its compact motors with customized cable and connector assemblies and a variety of options including flats, thru-holes, custom lengths, and more.

    The compact step motor line includes:

    • NEMA size 8 in two lengths (1.24 and 1.85 in.) and holding torque up to 4.53 oz-in.
    • NEMA size 11 in two lengths (1.22 and 2.05 in.) and holding torque up to 14.16 oz-in.
    • NEMA size 14 in two lengths (1.02 and 1.57 in.) and holding torques up to 25.53 oz-in.

    Applied Motion Products also offers stepper drives that optimize the torque and speed performance of its compact step motors while providing smoother and quieter operation. 

    [Image courtesy of APPLIED MOTION PRODUCTS]

    Editor's Note: If you have news you’d like to submit for potential inclusion in future weekly roundups, please send a press release and any related images to [email protected] with the subject line “Supplier Stories.”

Daphne Allen

Daphne Allen is editor-in-chief of MD+DI. She previously served as executive editor of Pharmaceutical & Medical Packaging News, which serves as the pharmaceutical and medical device channel of Packaging Digest. Daphne has covered medical device manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and regulatory issues as well as pharmaceutical packaging and labeling for more than 20 years. She is also a member of the Institute of Packaging Professionals's Medical Device Packaging Technical Committee. Follow her on Twitter at @daphneallen.

 

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