New biomaterials could regenerate and repair human tissues. In an article published in the Journal of Science, Professors Larry Hench and Julia Polak of Imperial College in London point to a "third generation" of biomaterials that will activate specific cells and genes of patients. Work pioneered by Hench and Polak recently led to the discovery of a family of bone formation genes that can be influenced by bioactive materials.

April 1, 2002

1 Min Read
New biomaterials could regenerate and repair human tissues

. In an article published in the Journal of Science, Professors Larry Hench and Julia Polak of Imperial College in London point to a "third generation" of biomaterials that will activate specific cells and genes of patients. Work pioneered by Hench and Polak recently led to the discovery of a family of bone formation genes that can be influenced by bioactive materials. Prompted by this discovery, researchers are developing biomaterials specifically for the regeneration and repair of tissue, shifting the emphasis from replacement of tissues to regeneration. An advantage of this new approach is that the body's genes control the tissue repair process.

Sign up for the QMED & MD+DI Daily newsletter.

You May Also Like