Verily Forges Rehabilitation Center to Fight Opioid Crisis

The company said technology could not solve the opioid epidemic alone and described the One Fifteen solution as a “learning health system.”

Verily is responding to the opioid crisis through the planned creation of a high-tech rehabilitation center. Dubbed One Fifteen, the proposed rehabilitation center is part of a partnership Verily has with healthcare providers Kettering Health Network and Premier Health, and in partnership with Alexandria Real Estate Equities. One Fifteen will open in Dayton, OH.

Verily revealed plans surrounding the center on a blog post dated Feb. 6, 2019. The idea for One Fifteen came from a team of clinicians, engineers, and health systems specialists. The group undertook an assessment of the opioid crisis and uncovered a complex set of challenges. The company noted that the crisis wouldn’t be solved by technology alone.

Data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse shows that every day more than 115 people in the U.S. die after overdosing on opioids.

“We recognized that a common thread through these challenges was the absence of high-quality information to guide individuals, communities, and legislators to adopt treatment models that they are confident will support prevention and recovery,” Danielle Schlosser, Senior Clinical Scientist, of Behavioral Health with Verily wrote in the post. Leaning into our capabilities of building health platforms, we are setting out to create a “learning health system” that aims to address this critical information gap in addiction medicine.”

Verily’s announcement of One Fifteen comes on the heels of the company revealinga $1 billion investment round. The company said it would use proceeds from the round to help with its collaborations and potential acquisitions.

The move also comes on the heels of Medtronic launching EMBRACE, a post-market study that will evaluate the use of the SynchroMed II intrathecal drug delivery system as an alternative to oral opioids. The Dublin-based company’s study will assess pain control and opioid-related side effects at six months following a route of delivery change to intrathecal preservative-free morphine sulfate.

And late last year, Boston, MA-based Pear Therapeutics gained a nod from FDA for reSET-O, an app used to help those with opioid use disorder stay in recovery programs.

 

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