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6. Cornell University (Tie)

    Arrow  backCornell University

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY)

Avg. starting salary for BME grads: $65,000

Undergraduate Acceptance Rate (campuswide): 15%

Total Enrolled Students (campuswide): 21,131

Tuition: $47,286

Recent Qmed stories about research at Cornell University:

Helping to Stop the Zika Virus' Spread

Apple Execs Think They Can Improve Your Medical Research

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5. University of Washington

    Arrow  backUniversity of Washington

University of Washington (Seattle)

Avg. starting salary for BME grads: $67,100

Undergraduate Acceptance Rate (campuswide): 55.5%

Total Enrolled Students (campuswide): 42,444

Tuition: $12,394

Recent Qmed stories about research at the University of Washington:

A New Blood Clot Strengthening Polymer You Should Know About

World's Thinnest Semiconductor Featured in New Nanolaser

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[Image by Ciar - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4236088]

4. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Arrow  backUniversity of Illinois Beckman Institute

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL)

Avg. starting salary for BME grads: $68,000

Undergraduate Acceptance Rate (campuswide): 60.9%

Total Enrolled Students (campuswide): 44,407

Tuition: $15,020

Recent Qmed stories about research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: 

A Photon Sensor for for Super-Fast Biodetection

Here's How You Build Biobots

This Health Tracking Tattoo Is Smartphone-Powered

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[Image by SPDvinny - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18350658]

3. Johns Hopkins University (Tie)

    Arrow  backMaryland Hall Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD)

Avg. starting salary for BME grads: $70,000

Undergraduate Acceptance Rate (campuswide): 19.5%

Total Enrolled Students (campuswide): 20,996

Tuition: $47,060

Recent Qmed stories about research at Johns Hopkins:  

Healing Broken Bones with Biodegradable Implants

A Better Bioprinter

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[Image by Cvenghaus, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24985588]

3. Duke University (Tie)

    Arrow  backDuke University Levine Science Research Center

Duke University (Durham, NC)

Avg. starting salary for BME grads: $70,000

Undergraduate Acceptance Rate (campuswide):14.7%

Total Enrolled Students (campuswide): 15,427

Tuition: $47,243

Recent Qmed stories about Duke research: 

Monkey Controls Wheelchair with Mind Alone

Bionic Eye Enables Man to See for First Time in Decades

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2. Columbia University

    Arrow  backColumbia University

Columbia University (New York, NY)

Avg. starting salary for BME grads: $75,000

Undergraduate Acceptance Rate (campuswide): 7.8%

Total Enrolled Students (campuswide): 26,050

Tuition: $51,008

Recent Qmed stories about Columbia research:

Decades-Old Coating Helps Usher in New Diagnostics Era

Graphene Nanocomposite Is Hundreds of Times Stronger than Metal

FDA Spoke and Power Morcellator Use Dropped

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Top 10 Biomedical Engineering Schools by Salary in 2016

    Money

You don't need to get a master's degree or spend a fortune to land a good-paying engineering job right out of school. But where you go to school really does matter.

Nancy Crotti

Pssst! Want to make some good money fast? Go to engineering school. (And if you already did, pat yourself on the back.) 

Engineers with baccalaureate degrees continue to draw among the highest median starting salaries in the nation.That's according to The Economic Value of College Majors, published by Georgetown University. Engineering degrees in general generate among the highest starting salaries for new college graduates, and a master's degree isn't needed unless the student wants to teach at a university, according to an article in U.S. News & World Report.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, biomedical engineers take home an average salary of $91,230-- more than the roughly $88,000 that is the average for civil and mechanical engineers and slightly lower than materials engineers' salary of $94,690. Still, biomedical engineers take home less pay on average as do electrical engineers, computer hardware engineers, and chemical engineers. 

(Want to see how your salary compares with that of your peers in the medical device and diagnostics industry? Check out MD+DI's Medtech Salary Survey 2016.)

It still matters where you go to school, though. We took a look at StartClass's highest-rated colleges and universities that confer biomedical engineering degrees to see whose grads the industry values most. It's Stanford University, by a longshot, where new grads pull down a median starting salary of $98,000.

The Ivy League scored three slots in our listing, with Cornell and  Columbia universities and the University of Pennsylvania. The biggest bang for your buck with the highest probability of getting in (if you live in Illinois or are willing to establish residency) is the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Note: In the case that there was a discretion between in-state vs. out-of-state tuition, in-state amounts were use.)

Check out our top 10 (with a few ties). 

Continue >>

Brush up on your medical device industry knowledge at MD&M Minneapolis, November 8–9, 2017.

Nancy Crotti is a contributor to Qmed.

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[Money image from Pixabay]

J&J Has a Serious Surgical Power Tool Recall

A new Class I-level recall involves 451 adaptor and light adaptor power sources for the DePuy Synthes Small Battery Drive and the Small Battery Drive II surgical power tool systems.

Chris Newmarker

DePuy Synthes Adaptor Light Adaptor Small Battery DriveFDA on Wednesday issued a Class I designation for a recall at Johnson & Johnson's DePuy Synthes business involving surgical tool power source adapters that might cause the devices to produce extreme internal pressure and explode. 

The recall includes 451 units of the adaptor and light adaptor power sources for the DePuy Synthes Small Battery Drive and the Small Battery Drive II surgical power tool systems. All 451 units were distributed in the U.S. They were made between October 6, 2005 and April 5, 2016, and distributed between January 2006 and June 2016. More information is available on FDA's website. 

The surgical tool systems, which include attachments for drilling or cutting bone during orthopedic surgery, are only used in hospital and healthcare settings. 

DePuy Synthes sent an "Urgent Notice-Medical Device Recall" letter to all affected customers in January, according to FDA. 

J&J media relations could not be immedately reached for comment. 

A search for "Small Battery Drive" on FDA's MAUDE database turns up hundreds of reports related to problems around the DePuy Synthes devices in 2016 alone. But only two report explosions--one out of Germany and another that took place during a veterinary procedure. No injuries or deaths were reported in either case. 

"As of today, the company has received one report of an adaptor bursting with no injuries occurring. The company has requested that hospitals immediately stop using the recalled adaptors and return them to the company as soon as possible," DePuy Synthes spokesperson Mindy Tinsley told Qmed via email.
 
"It's important to note that the adapter that was recalled was used for AC power rather than battery power and the complaints related to batteries are unrelated to this recall," Tinsley added.
Brush up on your medical device industry knowledge at BIOMEDevice San Jose, December 7-8, 2016. 

Chris Newmarker is senior editor of Qmed. Follow him on Twitter at @newmarker.

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[Image courtesy of FDA]

Medtronic Artificial Pancreas Wins FDA Approval

The MiniMed 670G insulin pump is the latest step toward creation of a fully automated, closed loop system.

Chris Newmarker

Medtronic MiniMed 670GFDA on Wednesday announced approval of the MiniMed 670G insulin pump, which its maker Medtronic touts as the world's first hybrid, closed-loop artificial pancreas. 

The 670G is the first FDA-approved device intended to automatically monitor glucose (sugar) and provide appropriate basal insulin doses, according to FDA. 

Medtronic plans a commercial release of the MiniMed 670G in spring 2017.

"This first-of-its-kind technology can provide people with type 1 diabetes greater freedom to live their lives without having to consistently and manually monitor baseline glucose levels and administer insulin," Jeffrey Shuren, MD, director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a news release

Wednesday overall was a big day for diabetes devices: Abbott Labs announced FDA approval of its Freestyle Libre Pro glucose monitoring system, a small, adhesive sensor that is able to collect up to 14 days worth of continuous glucose results to help doctors better evaluate how people are managing their diabetes. 

The 670G marks the fourth of six stages Medtronic is going through to develop what has been a holy grail for diabetes devices for decades: an almost entirely automatic "closed-loop" insulin pump system that does away with the constant glucose testing and insulin adjustments that diabetes patients presently go through.

In the case of the 670G, the device measures glucose levels every five minutes and then automatically administers or withholds insulin. Users, though, still need to manually request insulin doses to counter meal consumption. 

A clinical trial involving 123 people with type 1 diabetes found the device is safe for people 14 years and older to use, with no serious adverse events, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), or severe hypoglycemia (low glucose levels) reported during the study. (Medtronic is presently conducting clinical studies involving 7- to 13-year-olds; the device is presently only approved for people who are 14 and older.) 

Diabetes treatment is an increasingly important area for Medtronic. Diabetes group sales were up 10% during the quarter ended April 29, driven largely by sales of the MiniMed 640G insulin pump outside the United States. Insulin pump sales overall grew by more than 30% outside the U.S.

Brush up on your connected health knowledge at BIOMEDevice San Jose, December 7-8, 2016.

Chris Newmarker is senior editor of Qmed and MPMN. Follow him on Twitter at @newmarker.

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[Image courtesy of Medtronic]