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Articles from 2005 In September


Design Firm Wins Gold Award

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

INDUSTRY NEWS

Design Firm Wins Gold Award

Susan Shepard

The Embrace heart stabilizer, designed by Strategix Vision, is used during beating-heart coronary bypass surgery to assist surgeons in positioning the heart and stabilizing the coronary artery.

A strategy design firm won a gold award at the BusinessWeek Industrial Design Excellence Award (IDEA) for its work on the Embrace heart stabilizer. "We’re thrilled to be recognized for our achievements in innovation and design, and for this product in particular, for our ability to capture the human sensibility of the products we help bring to market," says Bill Clem, founder of Strategix Vision (Bozeman, MT; www. strategixvision.com).

The Embrace heart stabilizer allows surgeons to conduct coronary bypass surgery without stopping the heart. This results in lower risk to the patient. Additionally, the unit is less invasive than traditional methods and reduces the clutter and crowding in the chest cavity during surgery.

To develop this and other advanced technology products, the firm uses a strategic, in-depth design approach. With the stabilizer, the team spends hours watching surgeons in action, interviewing doctors, and overseeing more than 25 operating room procedures.

The IDEAs are judged on the product’s innovation, aesthetics, end-user benefit, ecological responsibility, and ability to improve its client’s business. Of the 1380 entries submitted in 2005, only 148 products were awarded: 38 gold, 59 silver, and 51 bronze prizes.

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Plastic Components Suppliers Form Alliance

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

INDUSTRY NEWS

Plastic Components Suppliers Form Alliance

Susan Shepard

A new 55,000-sq-ft manufacturing facility will open
its doors in fall 2005.

Three companies now offer OEMs injection molding of liquid silicones, thermoplastics, thermoplastic elastomers, high-consistency silicone elastomers and organics, high-volume flashless molding of organics and silicones, and subcomponent assembly. Hi-Tech Rubber (Anaheim, CA; www.hitechrubber.com), Inland Technologies (Fontana, CA; www.inlandtechnologies.com), and A. C. Hoffman Engineering (Anaheim, CA; www.achoffman.com) now serve as a single source for precision plastic and elastomeric components in quantities from prototype to high volume.

"Hi-Tech, Inland, and Hoffman have joined forces so that we can offer one-stop shopping to medical device customers that need high-quality precision plastic and elastomeric components," says Bill Sherman, president of Hi-Tech Rubber.

The strategic alliance of the three companies arises from having common parent companies. Red Diamond Capital and Century Park Capital Partners, private equity firms based in New York and Los Angeles, acquired all three in the past two years.

The companies have assembled a team of hands-on professionals with diverse backgrounds in mold design and construction, continuous high-volume molding, custom material formulation, secondary operations, assembly, quality assurance, customer service, and sales and marketing.

Hi-Tech, Inland, and Hoffman offer a comprehensive choice of processes and materials available. On most new projects, they can produce prototype parts in about two weeks, and then rapidly move into full-scale production. Every production part goes through an extensive start-up procedure and ongoing process validation.

The companies offer support for design and process engineering, material engineering, rapid in-house prototype tooling, and custom assembly and subassembly work. In addition, Class 100,00 cleanrooms and ship-to-stock service are available.

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

In Brief

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

INDUSTRY NEWS

In Brief

Injectech LLC (Loveland, CO; www.injectech.net), a molder for the medical device industry, has expanded its manufacturing capabilities by adding a 75-tn electric press to its operation. . . Oden Corp. (Tonawanda, NY; www.odencorp) a supplier of liquid filling technology, is celebrating its 25th year in business. The company designs, manufactures, and markets liquid filling, dosing, blending, and metering systems. . . Aerospace Display Systems (Hatfield, PA) and Transicoil Corp. (Collegeville, PA) have merged. The newly formed company’s name is ADS/Transicoil (Collegeville, PA; www.transicoilmotors.com). It is located in a new 90,000-sq-ft facility that houses engineering, manufacturing, sales and marketing, and administration for the company, which also has manufacturing facilities in Malaysia. . . Vision Engineering (New Milford, CT; www. visioneng.com) has relocated and expanded parts of its manufacturing facility. The firm anticipates that the new space would allow for more manufacturing to be accomplished locally and kept within the United States. . . Electri-Flex Co. (Roselle, IL; www.electriflex.com) announces its 50th anniversary in the flexible electrical conduit industry. . . GSI Lumonics Inc. has changed its name to GSI Group Inc. (Billerica, MA; www.gsigrp.com). The company’s Nasdaq stock exchange trading symbol has also changed to GSIG.

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Recycling Program Optimizes the Investment in Surgical Instruments

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

INDUSTRY NEWS

Recycling Program Optimizes the Investment in Surgical Instruments

Susan Shepard

An international recycling program collects, tracks, and redistributes orthopedic instrument kits. The program, created by Millstone Medical Outsourcing (Fall River, MA; www.millstonemedical. com) provides OEMs with visibility into their available inventory, an effective way to redeploy instruments in time for scheduled surgeries.

Surgical instruments have long been a costly burden for orthopedic OEMs because hospitals typically only pay for the implants used in a procedure. OEMs are required to provide the necessary tools, which means managing thousands of instrument kits nationwide for multiple product lines. According to Millstone Medical, this year alone many OEMs of orthopedic and spine products will spend more than $50 million each on instrumentation.

As new items enter the market, instruments are commonly misplaced and discarded, leaving millions of dollars of idle inventory scattered across the country.

Recycling lets OEMs deploy already-manufactured instruments much more effectively and turns a potentially marginal market into a highly profitable one. "With recycling, OEMs can provide the instruments that clients need, at 10% of the cost," says Shannon Tillman, president of Millstone Medical Outsourcing. "It’s a great service, at a great price, with substantial return on investment for our clients."

Tillman continues, "And it solves a problem that has been undermining performance in the medical equipment industry for decades: how to better optimize the required investment in surgical instrumentation."

Millstone Medical currently recycles surgical instruments for two orthopedic OEMs. By the end of this year, the company will have redeployed as many as 20,000 surgical instruments for just one of its customers, saving the client at least $3.6 million in less than six months. Companies with 100 surgical sets can save upwards of $9 million annually, since each set may contain 500 or more instruments, valued at approximately $200 each.

The recycling program gives orthopedic OEMs access to a secure Web site that lets field agents fulfill sales in as little as 12 hours with recycled instruments. By handling the cleaning, sorting, inspecting, repackaging, warehousing, online-system management, and redistributing of acceptable devices on behalf of the OEM, Millstone lets manufacturers focus on their core business of creating new products and developing new markets.

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

My Favorite Bookmarks

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

E-News

My Favorite Bookmarks

Nick John, Manager, Engineering
Dazor Manufacturing Co.

Nick John

Nikon’s MicroscopyU (www.microscopyu.com) Web site offers an educational forum for all aspects of optical microscopy, digital imaging, and photomicrography. Nikon microscopists and engineers, as well as scientists and programmers from the Optical Microscopy Division of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, provide the latest information on microscope optics and imaging technology. The site includes details on specialized techniques such as fluorescence, differential interference contrast (DIC), phase contrast, reflected light microscopy, and microscopy of living cells. If you have a question about imaging a particular microscopic anomaly, the answer can be found on this site.

With outsourcing being so prevalent in today’s manufacturing environment, Global Sources (www.globalsources.com) is an invaluable resource in finding suppliers worldwide. The site adds value by bridging the language barrier. Sourcing options can be found for nearly any manufactured item.

The International Society for Optical Engineering (www.spie.org) has become the largest international association for the exchange, collection, and dissemination of knowledge in optics, photonics, and imaging. The group’s site has information on publications, research, and conferences in many areas of imaging, including biomedical optics, nanotechnology, and medical imaging. In addition the site has timely information pertaining to mergers, acquisitions, patents, royalty agreements, and other business news.

The biotechnology industry news section on Yahoo Finance (http:// biz.yahoo.com/n/y/y0005.html) features the latest press releases on technical, regulatory, and business issues. You can do a symbol lookup on the site to get the latest stock quotes for your favorite biotech firms and headlines.

Combined, ZurichMednet (www. zurichmednet.org) and MBBNet (www.mbbnet.umn.edu/) represent the world’s first and largest medical/bio cluster/Web portal alliance, linking research and information resources for more than 1300 organizations. Zurich Mednet is a good resource for finding information about development activity in Europe, and MBBNet is a virtual community for Minnesota’s biomedical and biotechnology cluster.

Dazor Manufacturing Corp. (St. Louis, MO; www.dazor.com) manufactures task lighting equipment and magnifiers. Its most recent product is the speckFINDER video microscope, which can be used for inspection and assembly work by manufacturers, as well as in dental and forensics laboratories. - Corinne Litchfield

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Electronics Manufacturer Unveils New Web Site

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

E-News

Electronics Manufacturer Unveils New Web Site

Shana Leonard

www.cd4power.com

Electronics manufacturer C&D Technologies (Tucson) has redesigned its Web site. The company is a supplier of such products as isolated and nonisolated dc/dc converters, dc/dc and ac/dc power supplies, front-end rectifiers, inductors and transformers developed to support system silicon in power applications, digital panel meters and meter accessories, and a range of a/d and d/a converters.

The site’s features include product descriptions, on-line purchasing options, and downloadable product datasheets. Visitors who download a specific datasheet are given the option to automatically receive, via e-mail, any future specification updates for the part chosen. The site also presents customization query pages in order to cater to specific need of its clients.

In addition to basic product information, a variety of support features are offered. The customer support page provides access to services ranging from technical support to requests for free samples. Another page provides information on the Restriction of Hazardous Substances directive.

“This Web site is a single, on-line resource that brings together information on all of our products and technologies, and saves engineers and purchasers valuable time in identifying and sourcing solutions for their applications,” says Rob Hill, vice president of global marketing communications for the firm’s Technologies Power Electronics Division.

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Catheters and Stent Fabrication

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

Spotlight

Catheters and Stent Fabrication

Plasma arc welding system

A welding process for catheters begins when an operator lays a wire on the platform and slides the wire into tooling that holds it in place during welding. The operator presses a foot pedal to pneumatically clamp the tooling onto the wire. Once the tooling is clamped, the operator presses dual palm switches, and the tooling is indexed into the welding position and the weld starts automatically. When the weld is complete the tooling is retracted back to the load-and-unload position and unclamped. The catheter is removed manually. The complete system includes a custom-designed weld fixture with programmable logic controls, a plasma power supply, a low-amp plasma welding torch, a torch accessory kit, a weld programmer, gas regulators, ground cables, interface cables, and hoses. Process Welding Systems Inc., LaVergne, TN
www.pwsweld.com


Motion system

A fully integrated motion system used for stent manufacturing couples automated material-handling functionality with high-performance direct-drive linear and rotary motion capability. The integral linear-rotary design increases throughput by two to five times compared with traditional screw-based or other manufacturing approaches, while still maintaining submicron tolerances on tight-part geometries. The increased throughput of the VascuLathe means that fewer machines are required to produce an equivalent number of stents in the same time period. Aerotech Inc., Pittsburgh, PA
www.aerotech.com


Stent manufacturing

A company manufactures stents and other tubular devices from early development through full-scale production. Development services include complete integrated prototyping and design consulting to speed time to market for all types of medical device firms. Capabilities consist of laser machining, heat-shaping of nitinol, materials testing and characterization, and electropolishing and surface finishing. The company specializes in processing stainless steel, nitinol, cobalt-based superalloys, titanium, and tantalum. Nitinol heat-forming can be tailored to suit a variety of device-performance requirements. Burpee Materials Technology LLC, Eatontown, NJ
www.burpeetech.com


Tip forming and bonding

A process equipment supplier specializes in tip forming and bonding of medical catheters. The company designs and builds customized catheter-tipping and -bonding equipment and tooling worldwide. Its precision tipping systems are multiple-project machines that can tip or weld almost all thermoplastic materials. Programmable controls, a stepping motor drive for precision feed, and quick-change tools are some of the features. Cath-Tip Inc., Sandy, UT
www.cathtip.com


Catheter-processing equipment

Tube-processing systems are used to apply high-pressure heat during bonding applications for a variety of catheter systems within the medical device industry. Semiautomated process capabilities include multilumen welds, braided-to-nonbraided butt welds, braided-to-braided butt welds, balloon-to-shaft bonding, and balloon-to–distal or –proximal tip bonding. The company also offers the four-station vertical shrinker, thermal box, and distal or proximal tip bonder. Integral to the company’s bonding equipment is a Microswirl 360° thermal nozzle that provides uniform heating characteristics and minimizes the incidence of hot or cold spots during the shrinking process,
as compared with flat or “C” nozzle technologies. Machine Solutions Inc., Flagstaff, AZ
www.machinesolutions.com


Stent and catheter production

Prototyping, development, and production capabilities are offered for stent and catheter applications. Both metal and polymer tubes, including stents, can be processed with complex feature sizes as small as 2 µm. Smart catheters with conductive circuitry are being developed for sensor and marker band applications. The company is ISO 9001:2000 certified and can process prototypes within 48 hours. Potomac Photonics, Lanham, MD
www.potomac-laser.com



High-yield catheter production

Two systems are available for high-yield catheter production. The PIRF II system forms complex, small-profile catheters by concentrating heat in bands less than 1 mm. The precise heat placement produces high-quality tips and strong welds, which is critical when welding parts such as braided-to-nonbraided tubing and materials with durometers. The PIRF III system can tip multiple parts and can form large catheters. Both systems feature the company’s proprietary temperature control, which controls temperature to 1°C in each cycle. Sebra, Tucson, AZ
www.sebra.com


Catheter design and production

A company’s engineers specialize in tipping, drilling, neckdowns, and custom injection molding of catheters. Intricate designs, precision engineering, fabricating, and assembly of the most critical medical components are some of the company’s capabilities. Single-prototype to large-production-volume quantities can be accommodated. MedConnection LLC, Phillipsburg, NJ
www.medconnection.net


Catheter-tipping dies

Catheter-manufacturing productivity and end product quality can be achieved using a company’s catheter-tipping dies. NiColoy tipping dies ensure fast heating and cooling cycles, according to the company. The electroformed dies incorporate a uniform wall thickness as thin as 0.010 in. The surface finish inside the dies is 8 µm or better. Other features include integrated mandrel pins, complex tip geometries, good release properties, and the flexibility to work in any tipping machine. A two-week turnaround time is standard. NiCoForm, Rochester, NY
www.nicoform.com


Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Adhesives

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

Spotlight

Adhesives

Protective masking film

A clean, optically clear protective masking film has a very high coefficient of friction on its surface. This gives it light-tack, static cling–like properties when used with various materials, including aluminum-metallized PET, polycarbonate, polyester, and acetate. Employing silicone chemistry and coated in a cleanroom environment to avoid contamination, MF5 leaves no adhesive residue and contains less than 0.4 mg/cm2 of extractable silicone. It is easy to remove, yet adheres strongly to other substrates during processing at temperatures up to 325°F. Applications include specialty adhesive tapes for use with medical devices. CPFilms, Martinsville, VA
www.cpfilms.com


Adhesive laminates

A company offers a wide variety of custom-coated pressure-sensitive adhesive laminates such as foams, polyesters, polyurethanes, and nonwovens. Performance characteristics are tailored to user’s needs. Specialty laminates are toll or contract manufactured under pharmaceutical GMP conditions.
LTS Corp., West Caldwell, NJ
www.ltslohmann.com


Medical adhesives

Medical adhesives are suitable for wound-care and disposable devices that adhere to delicate skin, such as that of pediatric and geriatric patients. Available adhesives include hydrogels, hydrocolloids, medical acrylic, and new synthetic blends to bond to low-surface-energy materials. A thin-film dressing featuring 3M’s polyurethane medical tape and a reinforced wound-closure strip are offered as private-label generic-brand equivalents for use with kits and drapes. PCI, Dallas, TX
www.pcitechnology.com


Pressure-sensitive labels

A company continues to test a variety of high-performance label products for communication and security applications. Current initiatives involve color-shifting, luminescent effects, holographic layering, enhanced conductive and magnetic printing, and RFID technologies. Adding combinations of materials and conversion designs, the company is developing solutions for anticounterfeiting, product differentiation, and supply-chain simplification. Topflight Corp., Glen Rock, PA
www.topflight.com


Foam tape

A soft and highly conformable medical-grade pressure-sensitive polyurethane foam tape is available for direct skin applications, such as dressings, wound care, and medical device attachment. Medifix 9538 consists of flesh-colored 0.4-mm polyurethane foam, single-coated with a high-tack medical-grade rubber adhesive. The adhesive is easily removed from both skin and hair, is moisture-vapor permeable, and can be repositioned. It is supplied with a 76-lb white polycoated kraft release liner and has passed skin irritation, cytotoxicity, and sensitization product safety testing. Scapa Medical, Windsor, CT
www.scapamedical.com


Hydrocolloid adhesives

Integrated adhesives are designed to minimize the breakdown caused by the heavy fluid absorption that can occur in wound-care and ostomy applications. The products provide long wear times even in wet applications, and the level of adhesion to human skin can be precisely controlled. Alginates incorporated directly into the adhesive stabilize the fluid-handling properties and provide sodium/calcium ion exchange at the wound bed. GriggSmith Industries LLC, Richmond, IN
home.earthlink.net/~davdoc/


Epoxy

A self-leveling adhesive is suitable for bonding and potting in a variety of OEM applications. Available in clear and black formulations, the 10-Minute epoxy attains functional cure in 90 minutes, after a 10-minute working time. Once cured, it provides tensile shear strength of 2400 psi and peel strength of 20–25 pli. Bonds withstand dry service temperatures from –67° to 200°F. Both formulations are 100% solids, with very low VOC emissions, and both are mixed as dispensed using handheld manual or pneumatic dispensers with static mixing nozzles. Devcon, Danvers, MA
www.devcon.com


Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Durable Motion Control System Withstands Rigorous Daily Use by Multiple Users

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

Profile

Durable Motion Control System Withstands Rigorous Daily Use by Multiple Users

A heavy-duty motor and gearbox were strategically positioned to endure harsh usage.

Susan Shepard

The Clinitek Status analyzer from Bayer HealthCare (Tarrytown, NY; www.labnews.de/ en/products/pr_clist.php) automatically analyzes urine strips. This eliminates errors that happen with human visual judgments. It has a touch screen user interface, and a motorized drawer that accepts the reagent strip or cassette and automatically positions it under the instrument’s optical-analysis sensors.

Previous sample drawer systems worked perfectly under normal conditions with operators who were familiar with the instrument. However, prototype testing uncovered a potential problem with new users. When manually pushing the drawer in, it was possible that they could use too much force and damage the motor’s gear teeth.

"We required a motorized table that could withstand the rigors of daily use by multiple different operators, using different kinds of reagents," says Trevor Allison, R&D director at Bayer Diagnostics’ product development and manufacturing facility in the UK. "We were concerned that they would not meet our desired reliability specification. To address the requirement, we needed both a fast answer, and preferably one that could fit easily within our existing investments in production tooling and processes."

Bayer sought help from Cambridge Consultants (Cambridge, UK; www.cambridgeconsultants.com). The firm "worked in parallel with us and provided the answer within a matter of weeks, keeping an important product launch on schedule," Allison says.

The problem was relatively simple to define as a design task, Allison notes. "The major issues were how fast it could be produced, and the desire for the design to fit with current production tools and processes."

To begin the project, "we started with a detailed analysis of the specific motion control problem, both in isolation and in the context of the overall product," says Richard Snell of Cambridge Consultants.

The motion control system that the firm created involved a heavier-duty motor and gearbox than had been used in previous systems. It was also specifically located to ensure that force on the drawer could never damage it. Cambridge Consultants also provided electronic circuit advice to assist the Bayer team in designing an improved control and drive strategy. This involved sensing the insertion of the drawer by feedback from the motor windings and driving the motor in a more sophisticated way. Additionally, a special motion profile improves both the engagement process and the final positioning of the reagent under the optics.

The sample drawer itself and the mouth of the enclosure were also designed to make the table insertion intuitive, with mechanical shaping and visual indication of the right orientation. These mechanical changes were achieved using modifications to existing molding tools, thus avoiding the time and costs associated with making new ones.

"On tasks like this, with demand to complete in a short time period, our project control scheme called for all the mechanical specifications and tolerances to be meticulously verified, to ensure that everything would fit perfectly, and for rigorous tests to prove the design’s robustness and reliability," says Snell. This gave the client the confidence to put the design modification straight into manufacturing, he continues.

After 18 months on the market, the Clinitek Status analyzer has thousands of installations worldwide. It undergoes high-frequency daily use in hospital wards and healthcare practices, and there have been no failures attributable to design problems with the new moving-part mechanism.

Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Keeping It Separated with Filters and IV Components

Originally Published MPMN September 2005

Product Update

Keeping It Separated with Filters and IV Components

Fabric and metal filters reduce contamination risks in medical devices

Corinne Litchfield

Many medical applications require specialized filtration or screening products. According to Larry Loff, senior territory manager at Sefar America (Depew, NY; www.sefar.us), filters are still primarily made using traditional fabrics, but research on alternative materials continues. "In order to make a filter out of a particular material, its fibers have to have strength, elongation, and weavability," says Loff. PEEK is still under development as a woven fabric, he adds.

Filtration products, as well as materials for use in IV equipment, are featured below.

Membranes and Fabrics Filter out Toxins

W.L. Gore & Associates Inc. manufactures a medical membrane to filter out pathogens found in smoke and aerosolized fluids.

Several companies offer materials that are designed to filter out toxins such as smoke and bacteria. Sefar America’s Medifab fabrics meet the strict cleanliness requirements of the medical industry and are routinely tested for endotoxins and hemolytic substances. USP Class VI, ISO 10993, and cytotoxicity tests are performed regularly. The fabrics act as security filters and as wicking and spreading media in such products as infusion and transfusion sets, arterial and cardiotomy blood filters, blood bags, dialysis sets, and diagnostic test strips. Surface treatments, including hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings and plasma, are available for Medifab fabrics to enhance priming, wetting, and wicking properties.

A medical membrane is designed to prevent breakthrough of pathogens found in smoke and aerosolized fluids. W. L. Gore & Associates Inc. (Elkton, MD) offers the Gore medical membrane for surgical smoke filtration. The product’s all-in-one design combines high particle-holding capability and long life with a robust contamination barrier to provide protection to health-care workers, patients, and equipment. It is suitable for filtration applications in both laparoscopic and invasive procedures.

The membrane is a multilayer laminate combining a microfiberglass prefilter to trap smoke particles and a hydrophobic PTFE membrane to contain bulk liquids and provide fine filtration of smoke and aerosols containing bacteria and viruses. The prefilter also significantly reduces clogging of the PTFE membrane by smoke, allowing strong suction to be maintained throughout the surgical procedure. The all-in-one design eliminates the need for separate coarse and high-efficiency filters, making new device designs simpler and more cost-effective.

Available in a variety of product forms that can be adapted to existing or new designs, the membrane is readily processed in automated manufacturing environments.

Adult IV Filters Are Self-Priming

Adult IV filters from
Qosina are self-priming
and come with a choice
of tube or socket ports.

Self-priming and positively charged adult IV filters from Qosina (Edgewood, NY) allow for a flow rate of 25 ml/min at 36-in. water head height. Each HiFlo filter has a polyethersulfone (PES) hydrophobic membrane and a PTFE hydrophobic vent. Made from an alcohol- and lipid-resistant modified acrylic, the housing allows for visual clarity during use. The filters come with a choice of tube or socket ports that eliminate the need for adapters or fittings. The self-priming 0.2-µm filters have tube ports with a 0.120-in. OD, and are also available with 0.150-in.-ID socket ports. The positive-charged 0.2-µm filters come with 0.120-in.-OD tube ports or 0.150- in.-ID socket ports. The company stocks more than 70 filters, as well as connectors, drip chambers, spikes, injection sites, tubing, and bags.

Miniature Filters Offer Precise Flow Control

Bird Precision offers miniature connectors for use in liquid and gas flow control.

Miniature orifice and filter connectors from Bird Precision (Waltham, MA) can be used for precision flow control of liquid and gas. The connectors are available in orifice sizes from 0.0004 to 0.035 in. with standard filtration level offerings of 5, 25, and 43 µm. The company also offers 1/16 NPT barbed orifice connectors and 3-56 thread to 1/16 barb connectors.

Microscreen filters using a stainless-steel wire mesh are also available from the firm. This type of product allows for the least amount of back pressure because of the open area, as opposed to other more restrictive types of filtration media. Wire mesh filters are available in 5, 10, 25, 43, 73, and 100 µm. Other filter media currently used by the company are porous plastic, PVDF, sintered bronze, plated sintered bronze, and plastic mesh.

Adaptable Stopcock Replaces Three-Port Models

A stopcock allows for one-handed IV injections. The Twist-N-Ject stopcock from G L Medical (Beverly Hills, CA) is a four-way, four-port unit that can replace three-port models. To use the stopcock, a fluid-filled syringe is attached to the axial port located on top of the lever. The syringe barrel is then twisted to point the lever toward the desired port, and the fluid is injected.

Fluoropolymer Tubing Provides Versatility

Fluoropolymer tubing from TexLoc Ltd. is suitable for use in several types of fluid- and material-handling applications.

Fluoropolymer tubing products that are extruded from TexFluor PTFE, FEP, PFA, or MFA in a variety of configurations can be supplied with fittings. TexLoc Ltd. (Fort Worth, TX) has introduced the line of precision fluoropolymer tubing. Featuring a low coefficient of friction and antistick properties, each material has specific dominant characteristics. All materials are chemically inert, nonwetting, and nonleaching, making them suitable for a range of fluid- and material-handling applications. Offered in sizes from 0.004- to 4-in. ID, the tubing can operate at up to 500ºF.

Depending upon the material and configuration, the tubing can be supplied with compatible fittings or formed with flares, tips, or chamfers. The tubing provides unrestricted flow and is available with a low refractive index for applications where operators must visually monitor materials passing through the tube.


Copyright ©2005 Medical Product Manufacturing News