MD+DI Online is part of the Informa Markets Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Commercial Resources: Connectivity Providers

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

SPECIAL REPORT: IT IN HEALTHCARE

Medtech manufacturers should play a more active role in developing products for clinical connectivity.

Art Kerley

Return to Article:
Plugged, Unplugged

The emerging need for device connectivity and interoperability of systems used in clinical settings—and for managing the business end of healthcare—has stimulated interest from a wide range of IT solution providers. Suppliers in the field offer a broad range of technology products and services. A sampling of suppliers that are active in the healthcare marketplace is provided below.

Airbee Wireless
9400 Key West Ave.
Rockville, MD 20850
Phone: 301/517-1860
Fax: 301/517-1861
www.airbeewireless.com
Digital Speed Inc.
243 College St., Ste.  100
Toronto, ON
M5T 1R5, Canada
Phone: 416/971-4374
Fax: 416/978-6052
www.digitalspeed.net
IBM Healthcare and  Life Sciences
Rte. 100
Somers, NY 10589
Phone: 914/766-3572
Fax: 914/766-8370
www.ibm.com/solutions
 /lifesciences
Qualcomm Technologies
 and Ventures
5775 Morehouse Dr.
San Diego, CA  92121
Phone: 858/845- 0009
Fax: 858/651-4501
www.qualcomm.com
Axeda Systems Inc.
21 Oxford Rd.
Mansfield, MA 02048
Phone: 508/337-9200
Fax: 508/337-9201
www.axeda.com
DPAC Technologies
7321 Lincoln Way
Garden Grove, CA  92841
Phone: 714/898-0007
Fax: 714/897-1772
www.dpactech.com
Lantronix
15353 Barranca Pky.
Irvine, CA 92618
Phone: 949/453-3990
Fax: 949/453-3995
www.lantronix.com
Secure Data in  Motion Inc.,
 dba Sigaba
1875 S. Grant St.  10th Fl.
San Mateo, CA  94402
Phone: 650/572- 6100
Fax: 650/572-6101
www.sigaba.com
Capsule Technologie
79 rue du Faubourg  Poissonnière
75009 Paris
France
Phone: + 33 1 53341400
Fax: +33 1 53341409
www.capsuletech.com
eDevice Inc.
1120 Ave. of the  Americas, 4th Fl.
New York, NY 10036
Phone: 718/797-3500
Fax: 718/228-7077
www.edevice.com
Manmar Technologies  Ltd.
92 Dr. Natesan Rd.
Mylapore, Chennai 600  004
India
Phone: +91 44  2466277
www.manmartech.com
Siemon Co.
27 Siemon Co. Dr.
Watertown, CT  06795
Phone: 860/945- 4380
www.siemon.com
Cerner Corp.
2800 Rockcreek Pky.
Kansas City, MO 64117
Phone: 816/221-1024
www.cerner.com
Emerson Network  Power
P.O. Box 4100
8000 W. Florissant  Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63136
Phone: 314/553-2000
www.gotoemerson.com
McKesson Corp.
One Post St.
San Francisco, CA  94104
Phone: 415/983-8300
www.mckesson.com
Sun Microsystems  Inc.
4150 Network Cir.
Santa Clara, CA  95054
Phone: 800/555- 9786
www.sun.com
Cisco Systems Inc.
170 W. Tasman Dr.
San Jose, CA 95134
Phone: 408/526-4000
www.cisco.com
emWare Inc.
6322 S. 3000 E., Ste.  250
Salt Lake City, UT  84121
Phone: 801/993-7100
Fax: 801/993-7460
www.emware.com
PatientKeeper
Brighton Landing E.
20 Guest St., 5th Fl.
Brighton, MA 02135
Phone: 617/987-0300
Fax: 617/987-0490
www.patientkeeper.com
Symbol Technologies
6480 Via del Oro,  MS 21
San Jose, CA
 9511-1208
Phone: 408/528- 2749
Fax: 408/528-2530
www.symbol.com
Code Blue Communications Inc.
23436 N.E. 140th St.
Woodinville, WA 98077
Phone: 425/844-1779
www.codebluecommunications.com
HEI Inc., Advanced  Medical Operations
4801 N. 63rd St.
Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303/530-2626
Fax: 303/530-2866
www.heii.com
Proxim Corp.
935 Stewart Dr.
Sunnyvale, CA 94085
Phone: 408/731-2700
Fax: 408/731-3675
www.proxim.com
Zarlink  Semiconductor
400 March Rd.
Ottawa, ON
K2K 3H4, Canada
Phone: 613/592- 0200
Fax: 613/592-1010
www.zarlink.com
cStar Technologies Inc.
1-1122 Finch Ave. W.
Toronto, ON
M3J 3J5, Canada
Phone: 416/739-8484
Fax: 416/739-8998
www.cstartech.com
 

Copyright ©2004 MX

Space Technology Now Used as Mobile Hospital Cleanroom

Originally Published MDDI September 2004

R&D DIGEST



Erik Swain

Clean-air technology used in space is coming down to earth—and into hospitals.

A European firm has been testing a system to eliminate airborne microorganisms. Developed in the early 1990s, the technology originally provided clean air for astronauts on board space stations. In 1997, space station MIR was successfully equipped with the reactors. AirInSpace (Rosny sous Bois, France), with support from the European Space Agency's Technology Transfer and Promotion Office, has developed a portable clean-air tent for use where immune-compromised patients reside, or in areas where infection is a concern. The system can capture and destroy airborne fungi, bacteria, spores, and viruses. It has been shown to kill microorganisms that cause diseases such as SARS, Ebola, smallpox, and tuberculosis. It has also been successful in eliminating anthrax.

The space technology uses strong electric field reactors and cold-plasma chambers to eliminate microorganisms. The hospital technology uses five such reactors from the space technology. They provide an area free of infective germs around a patient's bed.

“The technology is targeted primarily for immunohematology, oncology, reanimation, and transplant hospital departments,” said Laurent Fullana, general manager of AirInSpace. “We have produced a smaller version with no tent for use across a wide range of hospital areas where cross-infection is a concern.”

The system has been tested successfully in five European hospitals. “The biological protection is very satisfactory and responds well to the needs of children with strongly reduced immune defenses following chemotherapy treatments,” said Francois Demeocq, an administrator at one of the test hospitals, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand—Hôtel Dieu. “It could also be used to provide protection after transplants.” 

Copyright ©2004 Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry

Patient Access in Action

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

SPECIAL REPORT: IT IN HEALTHCARE

Return to Article:
Visions of the Future

One important goal for health information technology is to provide patients with greater access to their own records. A system that offers just such functionality can now be seen in action via an on-line demo of PatientSite, a Web site created for patients of Boston's CareGroup by John Halamka, MD, its CIO (and the CIO of Harvard Medical School).

As Halamka explains in the accompanying article, the information that patients obtain is not provided by any one system. Instead, the data are made available by "middleware" that communicates with various health information systems to bring a great variety of patient information together on a single site. One million patients are in the CareGroup system, and all have access to their records through PatientSite, where the information is grouped into such categories as problems, reports, medications, allergies, visits, and x-rays.

Commercial Resources: Compliant Manufacturing Systems

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

SPECIAL REPORT: IT IN HEALTHCARE

Return to Article:
The Manufacturing Edge

Designing IT-based manufacturing systems to meet the exacting demands of the medical device industry is no task for inexperienced firms. Following is a list of suppliers with a specialty in compliant systems for medtech manufacturers. Companies in bold will be exhibiting at the upcoming Medical Design & Manufacturing West Exposition and colocated shows, which will take place January 10–12, 2005, in Anaheim, CA.

Agile Software Corp.
6373 San Ignacio Ave.
San Jose, CA 95119
Phone: 408/284-4000
www.agile.com
ETQ
399 Conklin St., Ste 208
Farmingdale, NY 11735
Phone: 516/293-0949
Fax: 516/293-0784
www.etq.com
Ingenuus Software
5165 Shoreline Dr.
Frisco, TX 75034
Phone: 972/377-4842
Fax: 408/522-9450
www.ingenuus.com
PCNalert
2700 E. Foothill Blvd.,  3rd Fl.
Pasadena, CA 91107
Phone: 626/585-2788
Fax: 626/585-2785
www.PCNalert.com
ASI Datamyte Inc.
222 E. Fourth St.
Royal Oak, MI 48067
Phone: 763/746-4248
Fax: 248/543-2882
www.integralsolutions.com
Exact Software (North  America)
8800 Lyra Dr.
Columbus, OH 43240
Phone: 800/468-0834
Fax: 740/382-0239
www.exactamerica.com
Lilly Software  Associates Inc.
500 Lafayette Rd.
Hampton, NH 03842
Phone: 603/926-9696
Fax: 603/926-9698
www.lillysoftware.com
Pilgrim Software Inc.
2807 W. Busch Blvd.,  Ste. 200
Tampa, FL 33618
Phone: 813/915-1663
Fax: 813/915-1948
www.pilgrimusa.com
AssurX Inc.
305 Vineyard Town Ctr.,
 Ste. 374
Morgan Hill, CA 95037
Phone: 408/778-1376
Fax: 408/776-1267
www.assurx.com
Fourth Shift
2 Meridian Crossings,
 Ste. 800
Minneapolis, MN 55423
Phone: 612/851-1500
Fax: 612/851-1560
www.fs.com
Minitab Inc.
Quality Plaza
1829 Pine Hall Rd.
State College, PA 16801
Phone: 814/238-3280
Fax: 814/238-1702
www.minitab.com
Relsys International  Inc.
16267 Laguna Canyon  Rd.
Irvine, CA 92618
Phone: 800/673-5797
Fax: 949/453-1817
www.relsys.net
Camstar Systems
900 E. Hamilton Ave.,
 Ste 400
Campbell, CA 95008
Phone: 877/506-8356
Fax: 408/558-9350
www.camstar.com
Honeywell Process  Solutions
101 Columbia Rd.
Morristown, NJ 07962
Phone: 973/455-2000
Fax: 973/455-4807
www.honeywell.com
MSC Software
2 MacArthur Pl.
Santa Ana, CA 92707
Phone: 714/540-8900
Fax: 714/784-3765
www.mscsoftware.com
Sparta Systems
 Holmdel Corporate  Plz.
2137 Hwy. 35
Holmdel, NJ 07733
Phone: 732/203-0400
Fax: 732/203-0375
www.sparta- systems.com
Datasweep Inc.
55 Almaden Blvd.
San Jose, CA 95113
Phone: 408/350-7300
Fax: 408/275-0225
www.datasweep.com
IFS North America
1010 N. Finance Center  Dr.
Tucson, AZ 85710
Phone: 520/512-2000
Fax: 520/512-2001
www.ifsworld.com
NetRegulus
One Tower Ln., Ste.  1700
Oakbrook Terrace, IL  60181
Phone: 630/574-9800
Fax: 630/573-6050
www.netregulus.com
Syspro
959 South Coast Dr.,  Ste. 100
Costa Mesa, CA  92626
Phone: 714/437-1000
Fax: 714/437-1407
www.syspro.com

Copyright ©2004 MX

Justifying Entry into a Developing Market

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

MARKET ANALYSIS

Emerging healthcare technology markets in regions new to U.S. commerce present surmountable hurdles

Ron Marrocco

Many medical device manufacturers have established a strong presence in the healthcare markets of industrialized areas such as Japan, Western Europe, and North America. For some, the time has come to look beyond traditional borders to the new markets of Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East.

This article explores the issues that international sales and marketing executives might factor into their strategic thinking when considering entry into developing world healthcare markets. With an emphasis on the developing markets of the Republic of Poland, the Republic of Turkey, and the Russian Federation, the article frames some of the obstacles and opportunities that need to be understood in order to define an international strategy with the greatest potential for success.

Analyzing the Prospects

Device Facilitates Dental-Screw Placement

Originally Published MDDI September 2004

R&D DIGEST



Erik Swain

The grid attaches to a patient's jaw and, along with x-ray data, provides a map for the accurate placement of miniature orthodontic screws. 

A dental researcher has invented a device that can help navigate the placement of a new kind of orthodontic screw without damage.

Dental screws are a variation of surgical steel pins that are used to piece broken bones together. Most U.S. applications have involved using them as a post for teeth implants. But FDA recently approved a new kind designed for more-complex orthodontic cases. These screws can hold wires where teeth may be missing or where movement of teeth could only take place by using headgear. They are designed to be removable and are very small.

A challenge, however, results from their tiny size. It is difficult to place them in the proper narrow spaces between teeth roots and bone. To combat that problem, Young Jin Jeon, a visiting assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine (Cleveland), has developed a grid device for use with the screws. 

The grid looks like a half-inch plastic square of graph paper. The orthodontist attaches it to a patient's jaw, and then performs an x-ray to show where the roots and bone are in relation to the grid. After numbing the gum, he then implants the screw using the x-ray and the grid as a guide. The grid is expected to lead to more accurate implantation and less risk of damage to the roots of teeth. “Without experience, it's difficult to know where to put the screws just by looking at an x-ray and the patient's gums,” Jeon explains. 

Jeon holds a permanent position as an orthodontist at Pusan National University in South Korea. When he returns to Korea, where he already has a patent pending, he intends to form a company to manufacture the device. 
The orthodontic screw has not yet caught on in the United States but is widely used in Korea, where it has led to a reduction in the number of jaw surgeries. 

Copyright ©2004 Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry

American Health Information Management Association

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

SPECIAL REPORT: IT IN HEALTHCARE

Return to Article:
Visions of the Future

When it comes to storing and retrieving medical information, the (AHIMA) can consider most other entities as the new guys on the block.

Back in 1928, before taking its current name, AHIMA was founded as an association of medical librarians with the goal of improving the professional handling of medical records. Today, the link to the medical record remains central to the organization and its 46,000 members. AHIMA still regards its mission as managing the information necessary to provide quality healthcare. As part of that mission, the organization pursues advocacy, education, training, and competency certification for those in the field—who are today termed health information managers.

(click to enlarge)

Seeking Validation

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

SPECIAL REPORT: IT IN HEALTHCARE

Return to Article:
The Manufacturing Edge

The cost and time required to validate new or upgraded software can be a major hindrance to the adoption of IT-based systems for medtech manufacturers. But IT vendors are working hard to simplify the process.

According to Marcus Yoder, vice president of industry marketing at Agile Software Corp. (San Jose), many medtech companies are paying up to twice the price of their software packages for validation services alone. Agile's solution is to offer a set of validation templates that cover each of the company's out-of-the-box functions. And when a function can be configured to suit a company's individual needs, so can the validation template. According to Yoder, Agile's tool kit helps companies validate their systems 80% faster, and also saves companies a tremendous amount in consulting fees.

A Knowledge Checklist for Global Expansion

Originally Published MX September/October 2004

MARKET ANALYSIS

Every international executive has come to appreciate the fact that the English language enjoys recognition worldwide. In respectful exchange, the U.S.-based medtech company leader can display a common understanding of the language of the local healthcare system and of healthcare politics in a target-market region. This will very likely appeal to the hearts and minds of prospective distributors, healthcare agencies, and customers in underdeveloped markets.

Business development efforts in overseas developing markets will be well served by a thorough understanding of the following aspects of any national market:

  • Public health issues.
  • The organizational structure of the healthcare system.
  • National health funding.
  • Healthcare priorities.
  • The status of healthcare reform.
  • The role and political focus of the ministry of health.
  • Trade partners.
  • The health insurance system and payment options.
  • Health expenditure as a percentage of gross domestic product.
  • Physician compensation.
  • Industry lobbying groups.
  • Demographics.
  • Political parties and their healthcare agendas.

New Indicator for Early-Stage Heart Disease

Originally Published MDDI September 2004

R&D DIGEST



Erik Swain

The automated system features an 
internal calibration system and can 
provide a user-friendly approach to 
assessing artery stiffness.

By measuring for atherosclerosis, a new device could enable early identification of people at risk for heart disease or stroke.

The noninvasive test device, which looks like a blood-pressure cuff, allows doctors to gauge artery stiffness by measuring blood volume in the leg. Early detection could lead to earlier treatment to reduce the likelihood of further cardiovascular disease. Detecting heart disease risk factors is crucial because 50% of men and 64% of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have had no previous discernible symptoms.

David M. Herrington, MD, a cardiologist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (Winston-Salem, NC), found that the test results for 267 patients were “strongly predictive of the extent of aortic atherosclerosis.” He published his findings in an on-line edition of Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association. 

Previous ways to measure artery stiffness have not been as accurate, Herrington said. “A lot of indirect measures, such as taking pulse pressure, have been used,” he said. “But it's difficult to tease out the differences between pulse pressure and blood pressure. And previous direct measures have not really been able to demonstrate that there was a benefit above and beyond other cardiovascular risk factors.” 

The difference with this device, he said, is that “an internal calibration is employed with each measurement, and that helps ensure it's properly calibrated for each patient it's used on. And we are able to measure pulse volume through a range of cuff pressures, so we can find the one that is equal to diastolic pressure. This allows us to take blood pressure out of the equation and evaluate the mechanoelastic parameters of the vessel walls independently.” 

Looking similar to a blood-pressure cuff, the device evaluates vessel walls through automated tests.

Another benefit, he said, is that “it is a user-friendly, automated procedure. You put the cuff on your leg, push a button, and it carries out the procedures required to measure properly. There are lots of quality control responses built into the software and hardware to help ensure the result is an informative one.”

The good news, he said, is that the manufacturing issues have all been worked out. The bad news, he said, is that the company that developed the device, Vasocor Inc., has gone bankrupt, and the owner of its assets, Credit Suisse First Boston (CSFB), is looking for a buyer, so commercialization can't take place until that happens. 

CSFB partially funded Herrington's study, which it sees as a key step in finding a buyer for the technology, said Greg Grimaldi, a CSFB vice president. “This is the study that we hoped would validate the value of the product,” he said. “Before [the study], there was nothing to show that this was any better than other alternatives. It is a crucial component that we feel makes it a salable asset.” CSFB is open to selling Vasocor's assets piece by piece or as a whole, he said.

Herrington's study also included patients at the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Columbia University Medical Center, and Jackson Memorial Hospital at the University of Miami Medical Center.

Copyright ©2004 Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry