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Molding Part Cost Calculator Benefits Molders and OEMs

E-NEWS

Molding Part Cost Calculator Benefits Molders and OEMs

Shana Leonard
www.ides.com/costmate
A plastic materials information-management company has equipped its Web site with an injection molding part cost calculator. A free tool, the calculator is designed to supply users with the estimated true cost of a plastic part. As a result, the calculator aids injection molders in providing an accurate quote and provides OEMs with cost estimates for enhanced planning capabilities. The CostMate, created by IDES Inc. (Laramie, WY), assesses actual part costs by evaluating data such as general, machine, material, processing, and miscellaneous costs. In addition, the instrument factors in outside elements such as profit margin versus markup when calculating part cost. Users can input known figures and the tool generates a report based on the information provided. The report consists of such information as projected profit and suggested price quote. Values can be entered in English or metric units and quotes can be estimated in various currencies.
Copyright ©2006 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Soft Contact Lenses Can Cause Serious Infections, Officials Say

Good basic hygiene, proper cleaning and storage of lenses, and quick reporting of problems to physicians are essential in preventing and containing the infection, says CDRH Director Daniel Schultz.

Conveyor Manufacturer Unveils New Web Site

E-NEWS

Conveyor Manufacturer Unveils New Web Site

Shana Leonard
www.shuttleworth.com
A company specializing in conveyors and product-handling devices has redesigned its Web site for improved customer service, navigation, and content. Among the added features to the Shuttleworth Inc. (Huntington, IN) site are more than 90 videos that showcase products in action. Videos related to the medical industry demonstrate the gentle handling of products, while accompanying overview text touts the cleanliness of the firm’s conveyors. Although product pages include overviews, informational PDFs that detail capabilities and specifications are available in the literature section of the site. The literature pages also includes various documents containing corporate and industry information.
Copyright ©2006 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Bill Would Reduce Liability for Defibrillator Use

The idea, according to an article that originally appeared in the Kitchener Record and is now available on devicelink.com, is to remove any hesitation about intervening when someone's life is at stake. And it's a good one.

Company Hosts Web Seminars

E-NEWS

Company Hosts Web Seminars

Shana Leonard
www.mocon.com/webinars
Facilitated by a company’s consulting and testing division, a series of free seminars will cover packaging, material testing, and performance topics. Mocon Inc. (Minneapolis) will host the monthly webinars, which focus on such themes as oxygen transmission rate testing, total package integrity, and package testing equipment. Participation in the seminars is in the form of combined audio conferencing via telephone and a Web-based presentation. During the Microsoft Live Meeting–conducted presentation, the presenter uses a cyber pointer in order to highlight key information. Each session is slated to last 30 minutes and begins at 10 a.m. CST in order to accommodate participants in a range of time zones.
Copyright ©2006 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Web-Based Tool Provides Conversions

E-NEWS

Web-Based Tool Provides Conversions
Shana Leonard
www.groschopp.com/stp.php
Free to users, a downloadable conversion tool can calculate the speed, torque, and power of rotational devices. Groschopp Inc. (Sioux Center, IA) offers the tool through its Web site in order to help customers with motor selection by eliminating the associated math. The conversion aide is user-friendly and intuitive; inputting two known variables yields the third. The tool outputs speed, torque, and power in revolutions per minute, pound foot and horsepower, respectively. However, the tool can be tailored to customer requirements with results given in other measurement units. The tool can display up to nine decimal points, and precision settings enable visitors to set the desired number of points.
Copyright ©2006 Medical Product Manufacturing News

In Brief

INDUSTRY NEWS

In Brief

A producer of custom- and insert-molded components has expanded its capabilities. Plastic Molding Technology Inc. (El Paso, TX; www.pmtinc.com) has acquired 40-, 190-, and 310-tn presses for plastic injection molding.

Christophe J-P Sevrain, former head of Delphi Medical Systems, has teamed with Saginaw Future Inc. (Saginaw, MI; www.saginawfuture.com) in an effort to help attract, retain, and assist in the expansion of life science industries, medical device and diagnostic firms, and medical service providers in the mid-Michigan area through the Medical Devices & Technology Initiative.

Copyright ©2006 Medical Product Manufacturing News

CDRH to Use Outside Experts for Postmarket Safety Issues

CDRH is badly understaffed as it is, and its ambitious plans for postmarket monitoring reform would stretch existing staff even further. So this move makes perfect sense. Kudos to CDRH Director Daniel Schultz for addressing the need.

FDA Hires Consultant to Evaluate Postmarket Practices

Biosensor Technology May Expedite Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis

INDUSTRY NEWS

Biosensor Technology May Expedite Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis

Shana Leonard
A sensor chip coated with species-specific genetic probes is placed in a multichannel reader instrument that measures electrical currents coming from sensors on the chip that detect bacteria.

Accounting for more than 7 million trips to the doctor’s office each year, urinary tract infections (UTIs) afflict an estimated 40% of women and 12% of men at least once during their lifetime, according to the American Urological Association. Though the infections are easily cured with antibiotics, diagnosis requires a lengthy bacterial identification process that can compromise patient care. However, the development of DNA biosensors may enable specific bacteria identification in as little as 45 minutes.

A microfabricated electrochemical sensor array developed by GeneFluidics (Monterey Park, CA; www.genefluidics.com) correctly identified the gram-negative bacteria in 98% of UTI-tainted urine samples. The results of the study, conducted by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, mark the first species-specific detection of bacteria in human fluid samples by this type of instrument.

Currently, lab workers culture specimens until bacteria are large enough to visually identify—a process that can take 48 hours. The sensor array used in the UCLA study produced results in just 45 minutes.

These expedited results could enable physicians to prescribe targeted antibiotics. In order to alleviate patient discomfort, physicians frequently prescribe antibiotics to patients exhibiting symptoms of UTIs without knowing the specific bacteria causing the infection. If this sensor technology is adopted by the healthcare system, doctors will be able to identify the most effective antibiotic for the identified bacteria.

“Our research also showed the GeneFluidics’s biosensor avoided problems inherent in alternative molecular approaches, such as polymerase chain reaction, that require the repeated copying of bacterial DNA or RNA prior to testing,” says Joseph C. Liao, clinical instructor of urology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “We found that these amplification methods do not provide reproducible results.”

Researchers conducted the study by coating GeneFluidics’s 16-sensor chips with UCLA-designed species-specific genetic probes. Each sensor featured three single-layer gold electrodes and each electrode contained one representative capture probe for a bacterial urinary pathogen. Urine samples were then applied directly to the sensor chips. GeneFluidics’s multichannel reader instrument measured electrochemical signals, which enabled researchers to identify UTI pathogens by observing elevated signals on the chip.

Next on the firm’s agenda is the integration of the biosensors into microfluidic cartridges, as well as the development of a similar faster and completely automated instrument. This rapid test could be available in two to three years.

“There is considerable interest in decreasing overall healthcare costs by providing smarter medicine,” says Vincent Gau, chief executive officer of GeneFluidics. “When laboratory-quality testing can be rapidly performed by anyone, anywhere, and the results made available in real time, we will see tremendous improvement in patient care. This joint project with UCLA may spearhead that shift.”

The research for this study was published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology’s February 2006 issue.

Copyright ©2006 Medical Product Manufacturing News