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Articles from 2003 In October


Matching Sensors with Applications

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

PRODUCT UPDATE

Matching Sensors with Applications

Melody Lee

Sensitivity, response time, and size are among the factors to consider 

Sourcing a sensor or transducer that perfectly fits your needs can be a tedious task. Once the application is identified, flexibility, sensitivity and response time, and size are additional factors to consider. In this article, several suppliers to the device industry describe how they are able to meet the exacting specifications of device OEMs. For a complete listing of sensor and transducer product and service suppliers, please turn to the accompanying buyers guide on page 52.

Sourcing a sensor or transducer that perfectly fits your needs can be a tedious task. Once the application is identified, flexibility, sensitivity and response time, and size are additional factors to consider. In this article, several suppliers to the device industry describe how they are able to meet the exacting specifications of device OEMs. For a complete listing of sensor and transducer product and service suppliers, please turn to the accompanying buyers guide on page 52.

Custom Parts Expand User Flexibility

Transducers from Phoenix Contact convert temperature signals from thermocouples, potentiometers, and sensors.

Not all manufacturers will be fortunate enough to find an off-the-shelf sensor or transducer for their needs. For more complicated applications, a custom product may be required. Loop-powered temperature transducers from Phoenix Contact Inc. allow custom configuration of measuring ranges, inputs, linearization, and diagnostics. 

"Our older modules used dip switches, which means there were fixed points to be set to," says product engineer Paul King. "The new multipurpose modules let you program the transducer to a variety of styles of thermocouples. You can also custom configure them to a temperature range. [The old modules] had a set range of 0°-400°F. You can now shrink that range down to the temperature that you will be using to get better results." 

The programmable transducers include an on-line measuring option when they are plugged into a computer. The thermocouples' behavior is monitored and charted using the software. Previously, additional modules and meters had to be installed to record point-to-point measurements. 

NTC Thermistor Offers High Sensitivity

BetaTherm's sensor integrates a thermistor probe to produce a response in 30 milliseconds. 

Sensitivity and response time are also key factors in choosing a product. Kevin Moran, group marketing manager for BetaTherm Corp., says that certain surgical procedures would benefit from sensors that are quick to communicate temperature changes. 

BetaTherm offers a microbeta-chip probe to measure or control body temperature in medical applications. With a response time of 30 milliseconds, the product is also helpful in sensing liquid levels, monitoring air and gas flow, and analyzing chemicals. 

"Sensitivity refers to the ability of the sensor to detect small changes in temperature. Similar to the speed of response, the sensitivity of negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistors is related to their size," Moran says. "This is one of the main advantages of NTC thermistors over other sensor types. NTCs typically demonstrate a -3 to -6% change in resistance value per 1°C increase in temperature, making them the preferred choice for many medical procedures."

Microsensor Enables Small Samples

Integrated Sensing Systems Inc. developed silicon microtube technology to measure the density of low fluid volumes.

In addition to its functionality, a sensor's size can be a critical factor. Some invasive medical procedures or measurement applications may call for minute package sizes. 

Integrated Sensing Systems Inc. had a small idea when it created its specific gravity meter. Small, that is, in terms of developing silicon microtube technology to measure the density of fluid volumes from 600 nl to more than 1 µl. The sensor uses a vibrating microtube that is about as wide as a human hair.

"There are [other] density meters on the market, but by using microfluidics, we can reduce sample sizes," says vice president Doug Sparks. This particular product has been used in drug manufacturing to test the fermentation of antibiotics and for specific gravity testing in urology. More recently, researchers of blood transfusion products have been looking into using the density meter for testing blood and cell density.

According to the company, the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based product is a fraction of the size and weight of conventional desktop meters. MEMS technology also enables integration of a temperature sensor into the micromachine density meter chip, improving sample results. The sensor's small size allows it to achieve test times of 3 seconds to an accuracy of four digits, according to 
the firm.

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Laser ProcessingEquipment

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

EQUIPMENT NEWS

Laser Processing Equipment 
The Novolas system from Leister Technologies welds microstructured parts with high reproducibility.

Microwelder Provides 2-µm Position Resolution in Plastic Assembly

Assembly of plastic microfluidic components has been facilitated with the introduction by Leister Technologies LLC of its Novolas µ laser welding system. The patented system combines a diode laser, precision mask, and fully automated mask alignment system. It generates microwelded seams with freely definable geometries, an advantage when creating parts to satisfy complex design requirements.

With position resolution of 2 µm and precise control of laser power, the noncontact Novolas system enables microstructured plastic parts to be welded rapidly with high reproducibility and very good weld quality. Weld line widths as narrow as 100 µm are routinely achievable. 
Leister Technologies LLC, 1253 Hamilton Pky., Itasca, IL 60143.



Deep-Engraving System Delivers Ultrafine Contours via Beam Steering

The G 10 engraver from Virtek Laser Systems features a Class I operating environment
and a small footprint.

Designed for engraving and marking tool molds, blow molds, mold inserts, erosion electrodes, and stamping and printing dies, a laser marking system offered by Virtek Laser Systems processes all hardened tool steels, graphite, and nonferrous materials such as ceramics. The G 10 deep-engraving system, developed by the German laser technology specialist FOBA Technology + Services, which has been acquired by Virtek, features advanced engraving technology, a Class I operating environment, and a small footprint. Among its applications are decorative engraving and surface finishing.

The G 10 laser system produces ultrafine 3-D contours in a single process without retooling or resetting. Equipped with three ac servomotors that enable movements of 300 mm along the x- and y-axes and 500 mm on the z-axis, and optionally expandable to four axes for 3-D engraving, the system handles workpieces weighing as much as 100 kg. It supports importation of all popular 2-D and 3-D graphics file formats.

The system uses a 100-W lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser. Advanced beam steering and a spot size under 100 µm make possible the creation of very crisp high-resolution engraved features. The G10 can remove tool steel at a rate of 12 mm3/min and graphite at 20 mm3/min. In subsequent surface finishing, the system is capable of producing smooth surfaces measuring less than 0.4 µm Ra with removal rates of about 5 mm3/min.
Virtek Laser Systems, 785 Bridge St., Waterloo, ON N2V 2K1, Canada.



High-Definition Laser Coder Is Specialized for RSS Coding

The DSL1 laser coder from Domino Amjet Inc. generates codes as small as 0.02 in. high.

Designed to implement coming requirements for placing reduced-space symbology (RSS) codes on medical devices and pharmaceutical products in order to improve patient safety by minimizing preventable medical errors, a high-definition laser coder from Domino Amjet Inc. operates with RSS coding software. The DSL1 laser coder uses proprietary RSS software from Barcode Technology Inc. to produce composite machine- and human-readable two-dimensional codes. The 2-D component of a bar code label marked by the laser is compact but has sufficient capacity for inclusion of a batch number, expiration date, and other data. The software-driven coder offers continuous real-time control in manufacturing settings, generating precise, perfectly readable microcodes with heights as small as 0.02 in.

The clean-operating, consumables-free DSL1 laser coder produces codes that are more easily read by machines than those printed with fluid technologies, as proven in extensive field trials over several years. The device design eliminates the possibility of inadvertent coder-generated contamination in critical production areas.
Domino Amjet Inc.,
1290 Lakeside Dr., Gurnee, IL 60031.


CO2 Laser Workstations Perform Micromachining on the Desktop

Desktop laser micromachining workstations made by Flying Laser Optics feature 0.1-µm resolution.

Fully enclosed CO2 laser micromachining workstations designed and manufactured by Flying Optic Lasers feature linear servomotors with digital sinusoidal drives, an extendable loading platform, vacuum fixturing, and a virtual joystick. The stand-alone desktop systems offer a 12 ¥ 12-in. cutting area and perform with 0.1-µm resolution. They are able to cut conveyor-fed parts.

A high-resolution CCD camera, a frame grabber, and software that are all available as options allow for minimal fixturing, which results in short cycle times, high accuracy, and, when feasible, full cycle automation. With machine vision, the workstations can check critical dimensions, inspect for part contamination, and pass or fail parts, all at the same time. SPC data can be generated and saved.

The manufacturer also offers process development and job shop services.
Flying Optic Lasers, 309 S. Cloverdale St., Ste. D-25, Seattle, WA 98108.




UV Machining Services Can Replace Existing Technologies

Job shop UV laser micromachining services, from R&D to high-volume production, are performed by PhotoMachining Inc.

A firm with a Class 10,000 contract manufacturing facility offers device OEMs UV laser micromachining services using excimer, frequency-tripled, and frequency-quadrupled lasers for R&D and high-volume production applications. Ultraviolet photons process parts using cold ablation, achieving small feature sizes and controlled material removal. According to the company, these UV laser sources are replacing some existing technologies, especially where part cleanliness and small features are desired.

Custom UV laser tools can be built to customer specifications, including on-line workstations, roll-to-roll feeders, machine vision, and robotics.
PhotoMachining Inc., 4 Industrial Dr., Pelham, NH 03076.


Turnkey Polymer-Welding Workstation Welds Sensitive Assemblies Safely 

A turnkey workstation, the Polyscan from Dukane Corp., produces very little heat and no particles. 

A fully integrated laser workstation for welding polymers, which is available from Dukane Corp., features a special head for steering and focusing the beam so that the equipment can be used to perform both fixed- and dynamic-beam welding. The turnkey PolyScan system is based on a patented diode-pumped solid-state laser that safely welds sensitive electronic and mechanical assemblies without generating any particulate contamination. The dual-function laser head enables tooling to be changed over quickly for production economy.

PolyScan operates with LaserCAD software that is integrated into the graphical user interface running on Windows 98/2000/NT. The software uses standard CAD drawing elements to visualize and control the working area; all necessary laser parameters can be adjusted for application to those elements. Commands and menus can be provided in any of five selectable languages.

Typical workpiece size is 1-20 cm, but custom machines are available to handle larger sizes. Several items can be processed at the same time, and workstation configuration can be augmented by the addition of table or motion systems to optimize processing.

The PolyScan system adds little heat to the workpiece, allowing welding in proximity to sensitive components. Bonds formed are dust and humidity proof and crack resistant, and the joints can be made invisible. Applications for the welding station include medical instruments, sensitive electronics, rapid prototypes, and short production runs.
Dukane Corp., 2900 Dukane Dr., St. Charles, IL 60174.


Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Microtechnology

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

SPOTLIGHT

Microtechnology

Microstamped parts

Special cutting and forming capabilities developed by a stamping company enable micromachined and metal-injection-molded components to be converted into precision microstamped parts. The result is enhanced dimensional control and a lower cost per component. The microtechnology has been applied successfully in the production of distal components of minimally invasive biopsy and surgical devices. Probes, needles, jaws, blades, links, and clamping forceps are among the components that can be precision stamped. Meier Tool & Engineering, 875 Lund Blvd., Anoka, MN 55303.


Micromachining

A contracting provider of precision machining, assembly, and testing services uses a variety of high-speed Swiss-type screw machines, CNC machines, grinding machines, and assembly systems to supply medical and dental device industry clients with various micromachined parts. Components from 0.02 to 1 in. diam are machined from brass, stainless steel, PEEK, titanium, cobalt chrome, and other materials. Small, medium, and large orders for almost any type of precision part can be filled. The company also supplies such subassemblies and small components as pins, sockets, and connectors for medical devices. Divisa Inc., 63 E. Main St., Kalyto Plz., Pawling, NY 12564.


Flexible circuit board

A thin, lightweight, six-layer flexible printed circuit board uses a thin rigid-flex layup to achieve a package with a very small footprint for incorporation into small-scale equipment. The board folds to fit the space requirements of a device. I/O connections are also integral to the board, thus eliminating connectors and cabling. The flex circuit offers OEMs an electronics component package that enables design of an ergonomic, feature-rich, simple-to-operate device of very compact size. The manufacturer offers multilayer flex and rigid-flex circuit boards for medical and other high-technology devices. Printed Circuits Inc., 1200 W. 96th St., Bloomington, MN 55431.




Electrofluidic connection systems

Miniature electrofluidic connectors that handle both fluid and electrical lines in a single package address requirements for user safety, instrumentation size reduction, and operating convenience. Fluid is either automatically shut off upon disconnection or automatically routed to another fluid line. The company that has engineered the technology can adapt the electrofluidic connector pair and bulkhead to specific requirements and military specifications. The vertically integrated firm completes design projects rapidly in close cooperation with the client. Sandbox LLC, Dundee Office Park, Andover, MA 01810.




Fine-wire grinding

A specialist in the precision microgrinding of wire less than 0.001 in. diam is able to maintain a surface finish of 10 µin. Ra on such fine wire. The company emphasizes its ability to grind nitinol but is also capable of producing close-tolerance wire and tubing components from stainless steel, tungsten, MP35N, and other exotic materials such as fiberglass and fiber-optic cable. Its programmable equipment can grind consecutive multiple tapers and tapers of any length. UTI Micro-Guide, 20600 South 



Microerosion machines

A micromachining equipment specialist offers flexible electrical-discharge machining (EDM) systems that perform precision erosion machining to the stringent standards of the microtechnology field. The SX-series EDM machines feature a microfine-pulse shape generator that is integrated directly into a microscale EDM head on each high-precision three-axis CNC machine. The small, user-friendly machines can process hardened steel, stainless steel, titanium, CBN-PCB, ceramics, and carbide materials. The extended-size SX-200 is designed to provide full automatic indexing and loading for volume production. Sarix S.A., Via ai Molini 22, 6616 Losone, Switzerland.


Ceramic-injection-molded components

Components with features smaller than 25 µm, or 0.001 in., can be manufactured via ceramic-injection molding (CIM) in production volumes. Parts that small also are produced from tungsten carbide, titanium carbide, and silicon carbide. Cutting blades, nozzles, orifices, connectors, electrical insulators, and dispense tips are among the many medical components made by means of CIM in a recently renovated plant that is equipped with molding-machine robots that fully automate the molding process. Small Precision Tools, 1330 Clegg St., Petaluma, CA 94954.


Micropump modules

Plunger-type metering micropump modules for incorporation into clinical analyzers, titrators, autosamplers, and other instruments offer high throughput potential with a maximum piston travel speed of 0.3 seconds per stroke. The maintenance-free precision HS-series OEM modules feature high stability: the coefficient of variation at 249.40 µl is 0.096% after 3 million full strokes. Their 20- to 30-µl internal volume minimizes reagent volume requirements, and their quick-stroke piston motion maximizes accuracy. Resolution is selectable between 0.01 and 0.003 mm per pulse. Sanwa Tsusho Co., Ltd., 2-6-16 Shibaura Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0023, Japan.


Drives

Ultracompact drive packages are offered for high-performance motion control applications. Combining a flexible controller and 250/500-VA output stage in a single case, the ViX intelligent servo drive supports multiaxis applications without requiring individual power supplies. E-series microstepping drives come in ac and dc versions; the former supplies up to 3.5 A of current to the motor and accepts 120 V ac of direct line power, while the latter provides up to 4.8 A at 24-48 V dc. These drives incorporate antiresonance circuitry that effectively suppresses the midrange instability inherent in stepping motors. Compumotor Div., Parker Hannifin Corp., 5500 Business Park Dr., Rohnert Park, CA 94928.


Molded rubber components

Custom-molded elastomer microcomponents are produced to demanding specifications from silicone, Viton, neoprene, EPDM, polyacrylate, butyl, fluorosilicone, PTFE, nitrile, and other NSF-, UL-, and FDA-compliant compounds. Prototype and production molding of seals, diaphragms, grommets, and bellows in simple or complex configurations can be performed for small- or large-volume projects. 
The manufacturer also stocks more than 300 million standard O-rings, backup rings, and Quattro-seals in a wide range of materials. R.T. Enterprises Inc., 7540 Linder Ave., Skokie, IL 60077.




Brushless dc motor

A high-performance brushless dc motor for medical equipment applications features built-in electronics that keep the package size small while providing smooth, quiet, efficient operation. BND12 and BND23 models of the motor/drive combination have torque ratings of 1.7-22.0 oz-in. and offer speeds to 12,000 rpm. The motion system manufacturer supplies a comprehensive line of brushless and brush-type high-performance motors, drives, resolvers, slip rings, fiber-optic rotary joints, and actuators. Northrop Grumman Poly-Scientific, 1213 N. Main St., Blacksburg, VA 24060.

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Flexible Prototyping Material Facilitates Redesign of Nerve Stimulators

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

PROFILE

Flexible Prototyping Material Facilitates Redesign of Nerve Stimulators

A new housing concept may cut costs by 50%

Susan Wallace

The one-piece housing on disposable nerve stimulators from Medtronic Xomed simplifies assembly and decreases the number of operations, according to the company.

In order to improve the production of its disposable nerve stimulators and locators, Medtronic Xomed (Jacksonville, FL) teamed with the University of Florida's educational initiative, Integrated Product and Process Design (IPPD; Gainesville, FL). The redesign project included goals such as a 50% cost reduction and production of the device to six-sigma standards. The team also wanted the product's design to allow the use of continuous manufacturing processes, as well as to improve its ergonomics.

Nerve stimulators are used during surgical procedures. During surgeries, relying on visual recognition of nerve structures can be difficult, and errors can lead to irreparable damage. The systems enable surgeons to find nerves by inducing small electrical currents to excite and identify them.

In redesigning the stimulators, the team first focused on the housing and the assembly process. It was believed that major cost reductions could result from a simplifying the manufacturing process and decreasing the need for rework. 

A seven-step assembly process was devised. The molded cylindrical housing is loaded into a machine and dimpled for component placement. The internal components are loaded into the housing from the top of the part and then sealed with a rolling operation. The new concept incorporates a clamshell design. The cylindrical housing is split along its length, with an assembly hinge and snap fits. The one-piece housing provides visibility and increases control during the installation of the internal components. Designed for manufacturability, the new housing reduces the number of assembly operations by nearly 75% and eliminates secondary work, according to IPPD.

During early design concepts, two rapid prototypes of the housing were constructed on a Viper si2 stereolithography (SL) system. While suitable for form and fit analysis, the prototypes could not be used for functional testing of the assembly hinge and snap fits. The rigid SL material did not offer the required flexural properties. To overcome this, small segments of the early design concept were machined in ABS for functional testing of the snap fits.

However, to obtain an analysis of the final design, assessing the functionality of the assembly hinge was vital. To do so IPPD used Somos 8120 resin made by DSM (New Castle, DE) to create new prototypes. The resin is a high-speed liquid photopolymer. It produces accurate, flexible, high-impact-strength parts using stereolithography.

"Somos 8120 is ideally suited for this project," says Michelle Wyatt, account manager for DSM Somos, "because the material is especially useful in functional applications, such as medical products, where flexibility and impact strength are critical requirements."
 
Upon receiving the Somos 8120 prototypes, the team noticed the difference from the previous SL versions right away. "The Somos 8120 prototypes were great," says David Rumsey, an IPPD team member. "They were definitely more flexible than the previous prototypes, and the finish and color were much better."

At the end of the project, the team made its presentation of the redesign to Medtronic Xomed. They used the Somos 8120 prototypes to show design and manufacturing concepts. 

"The team has done an excellent job with the new housing design," says Mike Maszy, manufacturing engineer at Medtronic Xomed. "I am equally impressed with the job they have done on design for manufacturing. We are confident that this work will deliver, if not exceed, the 50% cost reduction we are targeting." 

DSM Somos also offers materials for selective laser sintering. Its powder elastomeric polymer can be sintered to produce highly flexible parts with rubberlike characteristics.



Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Bioreactor Advances Functional Tissue Engineering

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

HOTLINE

Bioreactor Advances Functional Tissue Engineering

Device may accelerate development of tissue-engineered products

The six-station Items BioReactor from EnduraTec enables researchers to explore issues that will become critical as tissue engineering moves from the laboratory to production.

 Tissue-engineered products are expected to play a leading role in cardiovascular and orthopedic tissue repair and replacement. EnduraTec (Minneapolis) has developed what it believes is the first commercially available intelligent bioreactor for functional tissue engineering.

The Items BioReactor is a closed-loop nutrient-flow subsystem that applies mechanical stresses and strains to engineered tissue during its growth phase. It also allows researchers to query the mechanical condition of the tissue construct. Proprietary software enables estimation of the modulus; the simulation profile can be adjusted to optimize growth patterns.
The BioReactor design is based on the company's stent- and graft-testing instruments. The device allows researchers to seed the tissue construct and to apply various pressure and flow waveforms. Stimulating cell growth and matrix deposition in this manner helps scientists to pinpoint constructs with properties suitable for use in humans.

The Items BioReactor is available in a single- or six-chamber design. By growing six tissues at once, the multispecimen device makes possible in-depth analyses of how a bioreactor environment may enhance tissue growth. It also allows researchers to explore issues such as scale-up and tissue uniformity. These criteria are important as tissue-engineered products migrate from the laboratory to a production environment, according to the firm.

Both bioreactors are suited for the development of tissue-engineered blood vessels, grafts, and valves. Other designs for the direct stimulation of bone and ligaments are also available. 

EnduraTec 
5610 Rowland Rd.
Minnetonka, MN 55343
tel: 952/278-3070
fax: 952/278-3071
e-mail: electroforce@enduratec.com
url: www.enduratec.com

Norbert Sparrow

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Marking System Improves Identification of Medical Device Components

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

HOTLINE

Marking System Improves Identification of Medical Device Components


Customized markings on devices reduce the possibility of tampering and error

A cold-laser marking system labels plastic, resin, and glass in compliance with FDA-mandated identification measures for medical products.

 In compliance with FDA regulations mandating security measures for pharmaceutical and medical products used in hospitals, a cold-laser marking system improves the identification of tablets, capsules, and medical device components. Tri-Star Technologies (El Segundo, CA) offers the M-100L-M series, a permanent marking system to eliminate the possibility of tampering and reduce the chance of error. 

"One company wanted us to mark catheters for them so that when the catheters were inserted inside the human tissue, the marks were there for depth measurement," says Alex Kerner, the company's president. "The marks are not done with indentations or with liquids, and they can't be copied without having this marking equipment." The system can also be used to indelibly label plastics, resins, or glass in tubing, valves, connectors, IV bags, and other components. 
Incorporating a fully automatic, computer- controlled, high-speed UV laser marker, the product operates without damaging thin or thermally sensitive substrates. Devices are marked with logos, bar codes, pictures, or alphanumeric text to identify products or correlate with the object's length. 

According to the manufacturer, the environmentally friendly, cleanroom-compatible system does not use any inks requiring FDA approval, or other chemicals or solvents. The product is geared toward reducing inventory by marking small batches quickly. This eliminates the need to keep large quantities at hand.

Tri-Star Technologies
2201 Rosecrans Ave.
El Segundo, CA 90245
tel: 310/536-0444
fax: 310/536-9322
e-mail: alex.kerner@tri-star-technologies.com
url: www.tri-star-technologies.com 

Melody Lee

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Corrugations Make Kink-Prone Tubing Flexible

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

HOTLINE

Corrugations Make Kink-Prone Tubing Flexible


The product retains the chemical and electrical properties of straight-walled tubing

Tubing from NewAge Industries can be used in situations where tubing must bend around or through machinery.

Corrugated FEP tubing is suitable for those applications in which the special properties of fluoropolymer are needed and flexibility is also required. Corrtef, which was developed by NewAge Industries (Southampton, PA) is useful in situations in which tubing must bend around or through machinery, equipment, or structures, or in applications where tubing extension and compression are repeated. 

Manufactured from FDA-sanctioned ingredients, the product offers all the nonstick, electrical, and chemical-resistance properties of straight-walled, semirigid FEP tubing, which is prone to kinking when flexed. Plasticizers, which can leach into critical streams and cause contamination, are not included in the tubing. Other benefits of Corrtef include the ability to withstand repetitious flexing and bending, a clear formula that allows visual contact with the flow, a nearly zero bend radius, and vacuum capabilities of 29.9 in. Hg. 

Extension and compression do not affect the inner diameter of the tubing. The product is available in stock sizes from 1¼4 to 2 in. ID. It is supplied with cuffed ends, ready for fitting attachments. Various lengths, up to 12 ft,
are available.

NewAge Industries
145 James Way
Southampton, PA 18966
tel: 800/506-3924
fax: 800/837-1856
e-mail: psales@newageindustries.com 
url: www.newageindustries.com 

Susan Wallace

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Corrugations Make Kink-Prone Tubing Flexible

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

HOTLINE

Corrugations Make Kink-Prone Tubing Flexible

The product retains the chemical and electrical properties of straight-walled tubing

Corrugated FEP tubing is suitable for those applications in which the special properties of fluoropolymer are needed and flexibility is also required. Corrtef, which was developed by NewAge Industries (Southampton, PA) is useful in situations in which tubing must bend around or through machinery, equipment, or structures, or in applications where tubing extension and compression are repeated. 
 Read more...

 

Marking System Improves Identification of Medical Device Components

Customized markings on devices reduce the possibility of tampering and error

In compliance with FDA regulations mandating security measures for pharmaceutical and medical products used in hospitals, a cold-laser marking system improves the identification of tablets, capsules, and medical device components. Tri-Star Technologies (El Segundo, CA) offers the M-100L-M series, a permanent marking system to eliminate the possibility of tampering and reduce the chance of error. 
 Read more...

 

Bioreactor Advances Functional Tissue Engineering

Device may accelerate development of tissue-engineered products

Tissue-engineered products are expected to play a leading role in cardiovascular and orthopedic tissue repair and replacement. EnduraTec (Minneapolis) has developed what it believes is the first commercially available intelligent bioreactor for functional tissue engineering.
Read more...

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Interactive Web Site Offers Easy Actuator Sourcing

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

E-NEWS

Interactive Web Site Offers Easy Actuator Sourcing

www.ultramotion.com 

Melody Lee

Specifiers of precision linear actuators may benefit from the interactive Web site launched by Ultra Motion (Mattituck, NY), a supplier of high-precision, custom linear actuators. Web-site visitors can select a motor and lead screw for the Digit series of linear actuators, or motor, lead screw, and belt-drive ratio for the Bug series, and generate a force and speed curve on-line. Being able to configure an actuator and evaluate its performance on-line saves the customer time, and also takes the guesswork out of identifying a product to meet the application's requirements. 

"The Web site is well suited to the product," says Don Wismann of the company's marketing agency. "Companies that need a few or 100 units quickly can go to the site and pretty much design the product and have it supplied with a quick turnaround time." 
The Web site features the variety of Acme, ball, and zero-backlash lead screws that could be used with a selection of stepper motors, dc servos, and "smart" steppers and servos. Comprehensive outline drawings in various computer-aided drawing formats and PDFs of two actuator styles, the nose, end, and mounting hardware aid in the integration of the products.

The company specializes in custom high-precision electromechanical mini linear actuators and matching controllers suitable for hydraulic and pneumatic systems.

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News

Packaging Site Simplifies Customer Requests

Originally Published MPMN October 2003

E-NEWS

Packaging Site Simplifies Customer Requests
www.rollguard.com 

Melody Lee

A simplified Web site for Rollguard Products (Appleton, WI) allows customers to submit inquiries about their applications and make product suggestions and comments. The company develops and supplies protective packaging systems for rolled and cylindrical products, offering stock sizes of foam, fiber, and plastic roll cradles. The Web site's upgraded features include an on-line "Spec-Your-Own" form enabling customers to enter details and receive a response about their specific roll cradle application. 

"Our main goal in upgrading the site was to provide a higher level of product and application information," says Gary Lawell, Rollguard Products' inside sales representative. "Adding the customer forum section to the Web site has opened a new avenue of communication with our customers," he says. "It's driven by customers' input based on their specific needs."

Customers may also submit application suggestions, ideas, and comments in the customer forum area, offering direct feedback on how the company can customize its products and services to suit specific packaging needs. Links were also added to allow users to access current company happenings, request printed copies of product literature, and download PDF versions of brochures, sell sheets, and other printed materials.
"The feedback so far has been very positive," adds Lawell. "We made sure to maintain the user-friendly organizational structure of the site by keeping navigation elements consistent from page to page and making them as straightforward as possible."

Copyright ©2003 Medical Product Manufacturing News