When tasked with coming up with a way to cut healthcare costs in the United States, two Harvard researchers came up with an interesting, if somewhat controversial, conclusion: Slash technology spending. Kathleen Baicker, a Harvard professor healthcare economics, and Amitabh Chandra, a professor of public policy at the university, argue that many procedures are performed in that rely heavily on expensive technology have uncertain outcomes. The researchers cite angioplasties as an example of such an expensive procedure.

September 1, 2011

1 Min Read
Professors: To Save U.S. Healthcare System, Slash Tech Spending

When tasked with coming up with a way to cut healthcare costs in the United States, two Harvard researchers came up with an interesting, if somewhat controversial, conclusion: Slash technology spending. Kathleen Baicker, a Harvard professor healthcare economics, and Amitabh Chandra, a professor of public policy at the university, argue that many procedures are performed in that rely heavily on expensive technology have uncertain outcomes. The researchers cite angioplasties as an example of such an expensive procedure. Although they acknowledge that angioplasty can be life saving, the researchers also say that the procedure is overused and, in many cases, its use is inappropriate.

Advamed followed up saying that the report's suggestions were not helpful because medical-device spending has bareley budged in the last two decades (see the figure below). Cutting technology spending, they assert, is unfair and counterproductive.

To read more on the topic, check out the following Bloomberg article:

U.S. Must Cut Spending on Medical Technology, Harvard Study Says

med-device-spending(1).gif

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