Qmed Staff

October 11, 2013

2 Min Read
A Unique Device for Buzzing Away Pain Gets Noticed

A device, dubbed Buzzy, can disrupt pain signals as they travel to a person's brain. The product was recently featured on NPR and, in 2011, was the recipient of the Medical Design Excellence Awards in the "Over-the-Counter and Self-Care Products" division.

Buzzy

 

Buzzy is a small, fist-sized device that is placed on a person's skin next to the site of an injection. The device includes a specialized ice pack and a vibration mechanism. When Buzzy is activated, it starts to vibrate. Based on a therapy called gate control, the sensory stimulation generated by the device interrupts pain signals as they travel up a person's spinal cord. The device can also be used for relieving the pain from dental visits, cosmetic procedures, blood draws, and for IV starts.

The device was invented by Amy Baxter, an ER pediatrician based in Atlanta. The story behind the technology was covered earlier this year in a consumer publication.

After experimenting with different designs for the product, Baxter arrived on a combination of high-speed vibrations and cold temperatures. To use the device, thin ice packs are attached to the vibrating bee. The assembled device is then placed above the location of an injection. The device can also help to dilate a patient's veins, making it easier to insert needles with accuracy.

In addition, the device can be used to treat other types of pain. Since the vibration of the device can help block out itching sensations, children suffering from eczema can use the device for temporary relief. In addition, the device can be used when drilling cavities at the dentist or cleaning wounds. The device can also be used for relieving the pain from cosmetic procedures, blood draws, and for IV starts.

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