What does Brexit mean for the protection of intellectual property in the medical device industry?

Jay Erstling

Brexit will no doubt have an impact on the US medical device industry, but the question remains as to what sort of impact it will be. 

On June 23rd, the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. That surprising and unprecedented vote, known as Brexit, was just the start of the process of withdrawal. The first official step will occur when the UK invokes Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union, which allows a member country to notify the EU of its withdrawal and obliges the EU to begin the complex and cumbersome process of negotiating a withdrawal agreement. The UK will not likely leave the EU until the withdrawal agreement...

July 29th, 2016
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Augmedix uses Google Glass to eliminate manual data entry into electronic health records, saving precious time for doctors. We asked Ian Shakil, the company's cofounder and CEO, to tell us more. 

Marie Thibault

Doctors can use Google Glass and Augmedix to skip the manual electronic health record (EHR) entry.

The idea behind Augmedix is surprisingly simple. The business uses Google Glass technology and medical scribes to automate data entry for electronic health records (EHRs). Augmedix cofounder and CEO Ian Shakil has admitted it's a straightforward formula, but it seems to be paying off.  

Shakil explained that just a few years after its inception, the...

July 29th, 2016
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Engineers, take note: paying attention to how a clinician operates can lead to a well-designed device that enjoys widespread adoption.

Manan Shah, MD and Timothy O’Brien, MD

As clinicians, we know that surgical devices need to fit into the flow of a procedure in order to be used frequently. A key example of this is the coblator device, which is used during tonsillectomies. The coblator demonstrates how one company's solution to a simple surgical design problem resulted in widespread adoption despite other potential drawbacks.

Tonsillectomies are one of the most common procedures performed by otolaryngologists. Despite the frequency of the procedure, the authors of a recent study from Michigan State...

July 28th, 2016
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We searched for the brightest young minds in the medical technology field today. Read on to learn more about our deserving picks, all under 30 years old.

A few weeks ago, we put out a call for nominations for brilliant young people making an impact on the medical technology field. After culling through nominations from readers and editors, we asked nominees for more details on their work. Now, we're presenting this list of 19 impressive movers and shakers.

Some of our honorees knew when they were children that they wanted to work with medical technology; others were drawn to the field after learning of its special obstacles. We were inspired as we learned more about...

July 27th, 2016
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Anne-Marie Schoonbeek

Anne-Marie Schoonbeek, 27—MBA candidate, Harvard Business School

Schoonbeek didn't come to the medical device industry via the traditional routes of engineering or medicine. She became familiar with the industry while working as a strategy consultant at McKinsey and was attracted to the vitally important role its challenges play in society.

Schoonbeek chose to enroll at Harvard Business School to, among other things, understand how Boston's community of medical innovators is tackling healthcare problems. At an MIT-organized event, she met members of the...

July 27th, 2016
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Samantha Huynh

Samantha Huynh, 27—PhD Student in Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California

Huynh works in Dr. Terry Sanger's lab developing an exoskeleton that will advance assistive technology by using the patient's own muscle signals. The idea, conceived by Sanger, would be well-suited for patients with muscular weakness. Huynh explained that muscle signals can be read by electromyography sensors and those signals can be used to start the movement of the pneumatic muscles. Her exoskeleton...

July 27th, 2016
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Adam Bender

Adam Bender, 25—Mechanical engineer at Accuro Technologies

As a mechanical engineer at device company Accuro Technologies, Bender is part of a small team developing a handheld device intended to improve the accuracy of intra-articular injections. The product idea came from sister company, Eupraxia Pharmaceuticals. Bender set up an in-house prototyping facility at Accuro, making the design-to-protoype process quick and seamless; this has resulted in 34 prototypes in under a year. "This means we can pivot our ideas quicker based on our growing pool of feedback,...

July 27th, 2016
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Boyang Zhang

Boyang Zhang, 28—Postdoctoral fellow, University of Toronto

AngioChip was created as part of Zhang's PhD studies to offer a way to vascularize tissue with a permeable, mechanically stable polymer vascular bed. Zhang is part of a team of researchers hand building AngioChip platforms, which have potential to be used for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. 

Zhang explained, "Engineering vascular networks within a functional tissue is essential to...

July 27th, 2016
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Neil Shah & Maxim Budyansky

   

Neil Shah, 28 and Maxim Budyansky, 28—Cofounders, CEO and Chief Technology Officer of Avitus Orthopaedics

Shah, who had experience developing brain-computer interface technologies for NASA, and Budyansky, who spent time developing low-cost OB/GYN medical technologies for developing countries, started Avitus Orthopaedics after finishing the graduate program at the Johns Hopkins University...

July 27th, 2016
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Hyunwoo Yuk

Hyunwoo Yuk, 27—Doctoral student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Yuk and his colleagues are researching biocompatible, mechanically robust hydrogels that can adhere to many kinds of materials, including ceramics, rubbers, metals, and glasses. The researchers created a hydrogel that is 90% water yet offer very strong adhesion—Yuk noted that the strength of bonding "even exceed[s] naturally occurring strong adhesion like tendon-bone interfaces."  

The research is helping...

July 27th, 2016
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