Austin Walker

Austin Walker, 27—CEO of Innovein

A Northwestern-trained biomedical engineer, Walker was at the University of California, San Francisco with plans to become a surgeon. While there, he spent a year working on a novel design for a urinary catheter that would reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Though the IP landscape halted his work on that device, Walker—under the mentorship of his now cofounder Dr. Al Chin—developed his company, InnoVein. InnoVein is tackling venous stasis ulcers with a prosthetic valve for...

July 27th, 2016
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Omron Blauo

Omron Blauo, 25—CEO, Telescrypts

Blauo founded Telescrypts to offer high-quality, inexpensive wearable healthcare technology to remote populations in developing countries. The platform includes a durable sensor that is worn on a person's wrist. The sensor wirelessly collects patient data and that information is stored in the cloud. The data can be used by clinicians using a mobile platform. The technology is being piloted in Africa.

The company has locations outside the United States in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and Arusha, Tanzania...

July 27th, 2016
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We searched for the brightest young minds in the medical technology field today. Read on to learn more about our deserving picks, all under 30 years old.

A few weeks ago, we put out a call for nominations for brilliant young people making an impact on the medical technology field. After culling through nominations from readers and editors, we asked nominees for more details on their work. Now, we're presenting this list of 19 impressive movers and shakers.

Some of our honorees knew when they were children that they wanted to work with medical technology; others were drawn to the field after learning of its special obstacles. We were inspired as we learned more about...

July 27th, 2016
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Hyunwoo Yuk

Hyunwoo Yuk, 27—Doctoral student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Yuk and his colleagues are researching biocompatible, mechanically robust hydrogels that can adhere to many kinds of materials, including ceramics, rubbers, metals, and glasses. The researchers created a hydrogel that is 90% water yet offer very strong adhesion—Yuk noted that the strength of bonding "even exceed[s] naturally occurring strong adhesion like tendon-bone interfaces."  

The research is helping...

July 27th, 2016
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Neil Shah & Maxim Budyansky

   

Neil Shah, 28 and Maxim Budyansky, 28—Cofounders, CEO and Chief Technology Officer of Avitus Orthopaedics

Shah, who had experience developing brain-computer interface technologies for NASA, and Budyansky, who spent time developing low-cost OB/GYN medical technologies for developing countries, started Avitus Orthopaedics after finishing the graduate program at the Johns Hopkins University...

July 27th, 2016
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Boyang Zhang

Boyang Zhang, 28—Postdoctoral fellow, University of Toronto

AngioChip was created as part of Zhang's PhD studies to offer a way to vascularize tissue with a permeable, mechanically stable polymer vascular bed. Zhang is part of a team of researchers hand building AngioChip platforms, which have potential to be used for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. 

Zhang explained, "Engineering vascular networks within a functional tissue is essential to...

July 27th, 2016
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Adam Bender

Adam Bender, 25—Mechanical engineer at Accuro Technologies

As a mechanical engineer at device company Accuro Technologies, Bender is part of a small team developing a handheld device intended to improve the accuracy of intra-articular injections. The product idea came from sister company, Eupraxia Pharmaceuticals. Bender set up an in-house prototyping facility at Accuro, making the design-to-protoype process quick and seamless; this has resulted in 34 prototypes in under a year. "This means we can pivot our ideas quicker based on our growing pool of feedback,...

July 27th, 2016
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Anne-Marie Schoonbeek

Anne-Marie Schoonbeek, 27—MBA candidate, Harvard Business School

Schoonbeek didn't come to the medical device industry via the traditional routes of engineering or medicine. She became familiar with the industry while working as a strategy consultant at McKinsey and was attracted to the vitally important role its challenges play in society.

Schoonbeek chose to enroll at Harvard Business School to, among other things, understand how Boston's community of medical innovators is tackling healthcare problems. At an MIT-organized event, she met members of the...

July 27th, 2016
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Joanna Nathan

Joanna Nathan, 25—Director of Business Development, Saranas

When she was a senior at Rice University, Joanna Nathan was part of a team that developed novel pads for automated external defibrillators, an innovation that HoustonPress named "Best Medical Breakthrough" that year. 

Now, Nathan is at Houston, TX-based Saranas, a company creating a smart introducer sheath for interventional cardiology...

July 27th, 2016
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Nicole Moskowitz

Nicole Moskowitz, 25—CTO, IntuiTap Medical

Moskowitz is chief technology officer at IntuiTap Medical, a startup that resulted from a Biodesign fellowship at the Texas Medical Center. The IntuiTap device is intended to improve spinal tap procedures. In the CTO role, Moskowitz has led design, development, and proof-of-concept testing of the company's tactile-imaging platform and rapid prototyping of the device's functional components. She is also involved...

July 27th, 2016
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