News

Digital Health Dominates CES 2014: 3 Trends to Watch - #1


Posted in Mobile Health by Chris Wiltz on January 9, 2014

#1 - Self Tracking and Wearables

It should be no surprise to anyone that wearable devices and fitness trackers would be a big presence at CES. Once you have companies like Samsung making controversially sexist commercials around their wearable digital tech, it's pretty safe to say the bubble is expanding. According to the 2014 Accenture Digital Consumer Tech Survey, 52% of consumers are interested in buying wearable health trackers.
 
A July 2013 survey done by CEA found that one-third of mobile smartphone or tablet users have tracked some aspect of their health in the last 12 months. However no company has yet to create the iPhone of sorts of wearable trackers. Most pundits agree the first generation of wearables was a dud for a variety of reasons once the cool factor wore off, and while the next generation is promising, consumers and patients seem to be holding out for an even better solution. So far Fitbit has come closest with its new Fitbit Force band, released in late 2013, but even that device suffers from a limited amount of compatibility, particularly for Android users.
 
“[At CES] we believe we'll see the next stage with additional functionalities and ease of use” Korry says. “Wearables will be more discrete and will blend into people's daily lives by being embedded in clothes and everyday products.” Accenture also predicts a more user-friendly experience that offers more ease when it comes to analyzing data, sharing it across the Internet and social media, and data protection.
 
The show has already seen new wearable products from major companies like Sony and LG who have released the Sony Core and LG Lifeband Touch respectively – both targeted at tackling the next-gen fitness tracking market.
 
 Sony is entering the wearable fitness market with its "Core" line of trackers



 


Tags:
Printer-friendly version
Your rating: None Average: 4 (1 vote)

Login or register to post comments